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Taxation and Consumption: Evidence from a Representative Survey of the German Population

  • Bernd Hayo

    ()

    (University of Marburg)

  • Matthias Uhl

    ()

    (University of Marburg)

Using a representative survey of the German population, this paper studies individual consumption responses to a recent payroll tax reduction. Our results show that 55% of the respondents spend the extra money, indicating considerable potential for tax changes to affect consumption and economic activity. Our analysis of the socio-demographic and economic determinants of consumption responses suggests that temporary and permanent tax changes have a similar impact, that interest rates are an important determinant of consumption responses to tax changes, and that households with higher income have a higher propensity to consume.

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File URL: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb02/makro/forschung/magkspapers/20-2014_hayo.pdf
File Function: First 201420
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Paper provided by Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung) in its series MAGKS Papers on Economics with number 201420.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in
Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:201420
Contact details of provider: Postal: Universitätsstraße 25, 35037 Marburg
Phone: 06421/28-1722
Fax: 06421/28-4858
Web page: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb02/
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  18. Bernd Hayo & Florian Neumeier, 2014. "Public Attitudes Toward Fiscal Consolidation: Evidence from a Representative German Population Survey," Working Papers CEB 14-006, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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  25. Hayo, Bernd, 1999. "Knowledge and Attitude Towards European Monetary Union," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 641-651, September.
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  28. Matthias Uhl, 2013. "A History of Tax Legislation in the Federal Republic of Germany," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201311, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  29. George-Marios Angeletos, 2001. "The Hyberbolic Consumption Model: Calibration, Simulation, and Empirical Evaluation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 47-68, Summer.
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