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Who Supports Redistribution?

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  • Fumio Ohtake
  • Jun Tomioka

Abstract

Using an original dataset, we investigated the determinants of individual preferences over income redistribution in Japan. Although income level is negatively correlated with support for redistribution, it does not explain much; there are other important factors, which relate to dynamics and uncertainty such as income risk. Even after controlling for income, both risk-averse individuals and those who expect to be unemployed in the future favor greater redistribution. Interaction of aging and mobility proved important. Relatively poor elderly, who presumably have few prospects of upward mobility, strongly support greater redistribution, whereas younger people are less sympathetic to such a policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Fumio Ohtake & Jun Tomioka, 2004. "Who Supports Redistribution?," ISER Discussion Paper 0603, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0603
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    File URL: http://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2004/DP0603.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:fth:prinin:464a is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alesina, Alberto & Di Tella, Rafael & MacCulloch, Robert, 2004. "Inequality and happiness: are Europeans and Americans different?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 2009-2042, August.
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    4. Alan Krueger, 2002. "Inequality, Too Much of a Good Thing," Working Papers 845, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    5. Alan B. Krueger, 2002. "Inequality, Too Much of a Good Thing," Working Papers 845, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jhappi:v:19:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10902-017-9851-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2015. "Effects of Siblings and Birth Order on Income Redistribution Preferences: Evidence Based on Japanese General Social Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 589-606, April.
    3. Fumio Ohtake & Shinji Takenaka, 2007. "Attitudes toward the Income Gap: Japan-U.S. Comparison," ISER Discussion Paper 0687, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Gaeta, Giuseppe Lucio, 2011. "In the mood for redistribution. An empirical analysis of individual preferences for redistribution in Italy," MPRA Paper 32049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Takahiro Ito & Kohei Kubota & Fumio Ohtake, 2011. "Noblesse Oblige? Preferences for Income Redistribution among Urban Residents in India," IDEC DP2 Series 1-8, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC), revised Mar 2013.
    6. Eiji Yamamura, 2014. "Trust in government and its effect on preferences for income redistribution and perceived tax burden," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 71-100, February.
    7. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Social capital, household income, and preferences for income redistribution," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 498-511.
    8. Quang Tran, Tuyen & Viet Nguyen, Cuong & Van Vu, Huong, 2015. "Economic Inequality and Happiness: A quantitative study among the elderly in Rural Vietnam," MPRA Paper 81235, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Oct 2016.
    9. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Effect of social capital on income distribution preferences: comparison of neighborhood externality between high- and low-income households," MPRA Paper 32557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Molnár, György & Kapitány, Zsuzsa, 2007. "Bizonytalanság és a jövedelmek újraelosztása iránti igény Magyarországon
      [Uncertainty and the demand for redistribution in Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(3), pages 201-232.
    11. Eiji Yamamura, 2015. "Norm for redistribution, social capital, and perceived tax burden: comparison between highand low-income households," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 6(2).
    12. Peng Wang & Jay Pan & Zhehui Luo, 2015. "The Impact of Income Inequality on Individual Happiness: Evidence from China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 413-435, April.
    13. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Effects of siblings and birth order on income redistribution preferences," MPRA Paper 38658, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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