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Comparing public attitudes toward providing for the livelihood of the elderly in two aging societies: Germany and Japan

  • Hayo, Bernd
  • Ono, Hiroyuki

Using an ordered logit model on representative survey data, we study attitudes about who should provide for the livelihood of the elderly in two aging societies--Germany and Japan. We find that in both countries, those with higher income are more inclined toward the private option, whereas age has the opposite effect. Part-time work status negatively (positively) affects the inclination toward a government-based pension system in Japan (Germany). Other significant influences are the pensioner status of the respondents in Japan and specific left-wing party support in the case of Germans.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 39 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 72-80

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:1:p:72-80
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