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Comparative Statics of the Weak Axiom

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  • John Quah

    () (St Hugh's College, Oxford)

Abstract

This paper examines the comparative statics of Walrasian economies with excess demand functions which obey the weak axiom. We show that in these economies there is a precise sense in which goods that are in excess supply (demand) after some perturbation will experience a fall (rise) in its price. We apply this to an exchange economy with additive utility functions, which can be interpreted as a financial economy with von Neumann-Morgenstern utility functions. We show that when the subjective probabilities which agents attribute to a particular state falls, so will the price of consumption in that state. Another interesting issue is the impact of changes to the endowment on the equilibrium price. We develop conditions under which, for an exchange economy, this equilibrium map - from endowment to equilibrium price - will obey the weak axiom and another stronger, monotonicity property.

Suggested Citation

  • John Quah, 2001. "Comparative Statics of the Weak Axiom," Economics Papers 2001-W3, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:nuf:econwp:0103
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    File URL: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/Economics/papers/2001/w3/cswa.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jerison, Michael, 1999. "Dispersed excess demands, the weak axiom and uniqueness of equilibrium," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 15-48, February.
    2. John K.-H. Quah, 2000. "The Monotonicity of Individual and Market Demand," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(4), pages 911-930, July.
    3. John K.-H. Quah, 2000. "The Weak Axiom and Comparative Statics," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0437, Econometric Society.
    4. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680.
    5. Shafer, Wayne & Sonnenschein, Hugo, 1993. "Market demand and excess demand functions," Handbook of Mathematical Economics,in: K. J. Arrow & M.D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, edition 4, volume 2, chapter 14, pages 671-693 Elsevier.
    6. Hildenbrand, Werner, 1983. "On the "Law of Demand."," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(4), pages 997-1019, July.
    7. John K.-H. Quah, 1997. "The Law of Demand when Income Is Price Dependent," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(6), pages 1421-1442, November.
    8. John H. Nachbar, 2002. "General Equilibrium Comparative Statics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 2065-2074, September.
    9. Polterovich, Victor & Mityushin, Leonid, 1978. "Criteria for Monotonicity of Demand Functions," MPRA Paper 20097, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Ruscitti & Ram Sewak Dubey, 2016. "Monotone comparative statics in general equilibrium," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(1), pages 187-197.

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