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Management and Student Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment

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  • Roland G. Fryer, Jr

Abstract

This study examines the impact on student achievement of implementing management training for principals in traditional public schools in Houston, Texas, using a school-level randomized field experiment. Across two years, principals were provided 300 hours of training on lesson planning, data-driven instruction, and teacher observation and coaching. The findings show that offering management training to principals significantly increases student achievement in all subjects in year one and has an insignificant effect in year two. We argue that the results in year two are driven by principal turnover, coupled with the cumulative nature of the training. Schools with principals who are predicted to remain in their positions for both years of the experiment demonstrate large treatment effects in both years – particularly those with principals who are also predicted to implement the training with high fidelity – while those with principals that are predicted to leave have statistically insignificant effects in each year of treatment.

Suggested Citation

  • Roland G. Fryer, Jr, 2017. "Management and Student Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23437
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hoxby, Caroline M., 1999. "The productivity of schools and other local public goods producers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 1-30, October.
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    22. repec:hrv:faseco:30367426 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lee Crawfurd, 2017. "School Management and Public–Private Partnerships in Uganda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 26(5), pages 539-560.
    2. Alex Bryson & Francis Green, 2018. "Do Private Schools Manage Better?," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 243(1), pages 17-26, February.
    3. Gabrielle Wills & Servaas van der Berg, 2018. "Measuring leadership and management and their linkages with literacy in rural and township primary schools in South Africa," Working Papers 21/2018, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. Huber, Kilian & Lindenthal, Volker & Waldinger, Fabian, 2019. "Discrimination, managers and firm performance: evidence from "Aryanizations" in Nazi Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 102613, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Liang Jiang & Xiaobin Liu & Peter C. B. Phillips & Yichong Zhang, 2020. "Bootstrap Inference for Quantile Treatment Effects in Randomized Experiments with Matched Pairs," Papers 2005.11967, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2020.
    6. Aaron Chatterji, 2017. "Innovation and American K-12 Education," NBER Working Papers 23531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Clément de Chaisemartin & Jaime Ramirez-Cuellar, 2020. "At What Level Should One Cluster Standard Errors in Paired Experiments, and in Stratified Experiments with Small Strata?," NBER Working Papers 27609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Roland G. Fryer, Jr & Meghan Howard Noveck, 2017. "High-Dosage Tutoring and Reading Achievement: Evidence from New York City," NBER Working Papers 23792, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General

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