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Charter Schools and Labor Market Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Will S. Dobbie
  • Roland G. Fryer, Jr

Abstract

We estimate the impact of charter schools on early-life labor market outcomes using administrative data from Texas. We find that, at the mean, charter schools have no impact on test scores and a negative impact on earnings. No Excuses charter schools increase test scores and four-year college enrollment, but have a small and statistically insignificant impact on earnings, while other types of charter schools decrease test scores, four-year college enrollment, and earnings. Moving to school-level estimates, we find that charter schools that decrease test scores also tend to decrease earnings, while charter schools that increase test scores have no discernible impact on earnings. In contrast, high school graduation effects are predictive of earnings effects throughout the distribution of school quality. The paper concludes with a speculative discussion of what might explain our set of facts.

Suggested Citation

  • Will S. Dobbie & Roland G. Fryer, Jr, 2016. "Charter Schools and Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 22502, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22502
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous schools and strategic pupil exclusion," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88678, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Eyles, Andrew & Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra, 2017. "Unexpected school reform: Academisation of primary schools in England," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 108-121.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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