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Long-term Contextual Effects in Education: Schools and Neighborhoods

Author

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  • Jean-William Laliberté

    (University of Calgary)

Abstract

To what extent do differences in educational outcomes across neighborhoods reflect discrepancies in local school quality? This paper decomposes total childhood exposure effects -- the causal effect of growing up in a better area -- into separate school and non-school neighborhood components. To do so, it brings together two research designs. First, I implement a spatial regression-discontinuity design to estimate school effects. Second, I study students who move across neighborhoods in Montreal during childhood to estimate total exposure effects. I find that total exposure effects on educational attainment are large, but that between 50% and 70% of the long-term benefits of moving to a better area are due to access to better schools rather than to neighborhoods themselves.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-William Laliberté, "undated". "Long-term Contextual Effects in Education: Schools and Neighborhoods," Working Papers 2019-01, Department of Economics, University of Calgary.
  • Handle: RePEc:clg:wpaper:2019-01
    as

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    File URL: https://econ.ucalgary.ca/sites/econ.ucalgary.ca.manageprofile/files/unitis/publications/1-9157958/meesr_dec2018_compressed.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    11. repec:hrv:faseco:30749073 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Lefebvre, Pierre & Merrigan, Philip & Verstraete, Matthieu, 2011. "Public subsidies to private schools do make a difference for achievement in mathematics: Longitudinal evidence from Canada," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 79-98, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    school quality; neighborhood effects; childhood exposure;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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