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Long-Run Effects from Comprehensive Student Support: Evidence from Pathways to Education

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  • Adam M. Lavecchia
  • Philip Oreopoulos
  • Robert S. Brown

Abstract

Offering comprehensive education support services to disadvantaged students shows promise for improving academic attainment. We explore longer-term impacts of the Pathways to Education program, a set of coaching, tutoring, group activities, and financial incentives initially offered in 2001 to grade-nine students living in the largest public housing community in Toronto. Using a difference-in-difference methodology and matching school records to income tax data through age 28 for a sample of students living in public housing under similar circumstances, we find that Pathways eligibility increased adult annual earnings by 19 percent, employment by 14 percent, and reduced welfare receipt by more than 30 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam M. Lavecchia & Philip Oreopoulos & Robert S. Brown, 2020. "Long-Run Effects from Comprehensive Student Support: Evidence from Pathways to Education," American Economic Review: Insights, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 209-224, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aerins:v:2:y:2020:i:2:p:209-24
    DOI: 10.3886/E111223V1
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aeri.20190114
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship

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