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Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion

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Listed:
  • Machin, Stephen

    () (London School of Economics)

  • Sandi, Matteo

    () (University of Sussex)

Abstract

This paper studies whether pupil performance gains in autonomous schools in England can be attributed to the strategic exclusion of poorly performing pupils. In England there were two phases of academy school introduction, the first in the 2000s being a school improvement programme for poorly per-forming schools, the second a mass academisation programme from 2010 for better-performing schools. Overall, exclusion rates are higher in academies, with the earlier programme featuring a much higher increase in the exclusion rates. However, rather than a means of test score manipulation, the higher exclusion rate reflects the rigorous discipline enforced by the pre-2010 academies.

Suggested Citation

  • Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion," IZA Discussion Papers 11478, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11478
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Parag A. Pathak & Christopher R. Walters, 2013. "Explaining Charter School Effectiveness," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 1-27, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    academies; discipline; exclusion;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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