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Automatic Grade Promotion and Student Performance: Evidence from Brazil

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  • Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner

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Abstract

This paper examines the effect of automatic grade promotion on academic achievement in 1,993 public primary schools in Brazil. A difference-in-differences approach that exploits variation over time and across schools in the grade promotion regime allows the identification of the treatment effect of automatic promotion. I find a negative and significant effect of about 7% of a standard deviation on math test scores. I provide evidence in support of the interpretation of the estimates as disincentive effect of automatic promotion. The findings contribute to the understanding of retention policies by focussing on the ex-ante effect of repetition and are important for more complete cost-benefit considerations of grade retention.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner, 2011. "Automatic Grade Promotion and Student Performance: Evidence from Brazil," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/52, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Sep 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:11/52
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    Cited by:

    1. Leighton, Margaret & Souza, Priscila & Straub, Stéphane, 2016. "Social Promotion in Primary School: Immediate and Cumulated Effects on Attainment," TSE Working Papers 16-649, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    2. Karthik Muralidharan & Abhijeet Singh & Alejandro J. Ganimian, 2016. "Disrupting Education? Experimental Evidence on Technology-Aided Instruction in India," NBER Working Papers 22923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Cabrera Hernández, Francisco-Javier, 2016. "Essays on the impact evaluation of education policies in Mexico," Economics PhD Theses 0316, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    4. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2016. "Access to education and teenage childbearing," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/15, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    5. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2016. "Access to Education and Teenage Pregnancy," CINCH Working Paper Series 1604, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Aug 2016.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Grade retention; automatic promotion; incentives to learn; primary education; Brazil.;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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