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Access to education and teenage childbearing

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  • Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner
  • Jesse Matheson

Abstract

We look at the effect of expanding secondary school access on teenage childbearing in Brazil. For this purpose we combine information from the Brazilian school census with vital statistics data. Variation in the introduction of schools across municipalities over time is used to estimate the effect of education access on teenage births. Our results show a 4.56% reduction in municipal teenage childbearing following a school introduction. These results suggest that Brazil’s secondary school expansion between 1997 and 2010 can account for 25% of a substantial decline in teenage childbearing observed over the same period.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson, 2016. "Access to education and teenage childbearing," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/15, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:16/15
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    File URL: https://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/dp16-15.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Secondary education; teenage childbearing; Brazil;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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