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What Determines Sectoral Trade in the Enlarged EU?

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Abstract

In this paper we estimate a sectoral gravity model for trade within a heterogeneous trade bloc, the enlarged EU, comprised of a high-income group (wealthiest EU), a middle-income group (Greece, Portugal and Spain), and a low-income group (acceding Central and Eastern European countries). The estimation was conducted on sectors with different degrees of scale economies and skill-intensities in the presence of transport costs. The results offer support for the call to incorporate trade theories based on both endowments and scale economies. In addition, whilst integrating poorer countries is beneficial for all of the participants in the bloc, there is still a role for redistribution policy. However, the EU’s Regional Policy, for example, should not be individual initiatives but should be a mix of policies, focussing on both income and education/skills, together with infrastructure development.

Suggested Citation

  • Helena Marques & Hugh Metcalf, 2003. "What Determines Sectoral Trade in the Enlarged EU?," Discussion Paper Series 2003_8, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:lbo:lbowps:2003_8
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    Cited by:

    1. Groizard, José Luis & Marques, Helena & Santana, María, 2014. "Islands in trade: Disentangling distance from border effects," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 8, pages 1-46.
    2. Sebastian Benz, 2014. "Essays on Offshoring, Wage Inequality and Innovation," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 56, June.
    3. Basher A. Balg & Hugh Metcalf, 2010. "Modeling Exchange Rate Volatility," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 109-120, February.
    4. repec:eee:joecas:v:13:y:2016:i:c:p:8-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Utai UPRASEN & Bernadette ANDREOSSO-O'CALLAGHAN, "undated". "Impact of the 5th EU Enlargement on ASEAN," EcoMod2008 23800145, EcoMod.
    6. Sebastian Benz & Mario Larch & Markus Zimmer, 2014. "The Structure of Europe: International Input–Output Analysis with Trade in Intermediate Inputs and Capital Flows," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 461-474, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gravity model; trade; human capital; EU enlargement;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing

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