IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Structure of Europe:International Input-Output Analysis with Trade inIntermediate Inputs and Capital Flows

  • Sebastian Benz

    ()

  • Mario Larch
  • Markus Zimmer

    ()

In this paper we theoretically derive an international Rybczynski matrix. Its elements indicate the aggregate output change in a country when endowment with one or more factors in the same or another country is increased. This allows us to characterize theproduction structure in 11 countries of the European Union. Starting from a baseline case with free trade in final goods only, we analyze two types of interaction between countries: international trade of intermediate inputs and internationally mobile capital.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-Ifo_Working_Papers/wp-ifo-2013/IfoWorkingPaper-161.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its series Ifo Working Paper Series with number Ifo Working Paper No. 161.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_161
Contact details of provider: Postal: Poschingerstrasse 5, 81679 Munich
Phone: +49 (89) 9224-0
Fax: +49 (89) 985369
Web page: http://www.cesifo-group.deEmail:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Gauthier-Loiselle, Marjolaine & Hunt, Jennifer, 2009. "How Much Does Immigration Boost Innovation?," CEPR Discussion Papers 7116, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Michaela Trippl & Gunther Maier, 2007. "Knowledge Spillover Agents and Regional Development," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2007_01, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  3. repec:dgr:uvatin:20110112 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2006. "Migration and Innovation - Does Cultural Diversity Matter for Regional R&D Activity?," ERSA conference papers ersa06p31, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Doireann Fitzgerald & Juan Carlos Hallak, 2004. "Specialization, Factor Accumulation and Development," NBER Working Papers 10638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Hunt, Jennifer, 2010. "Which Immigrants Are Most Innovative and Entrepreneurial: Distinctions by Entry Visa," CEPR Discussion Papers 7699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Opp, Marcus M. & Sonnenschein, Hugo F. & Tombazos, Christis G., 2009. "Rybczynski's Theorem in the Heckscher-Ohlin World -- Anything Goes," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 137-142, September.
  8. Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "Minority positions in theGerman Council of Economic Experts: A political economic analysis," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper No. 160, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  9. Robert C. Feenstra & Gordon H. Hanson, 1999. "The Impact Of Outsourcing And High-Technology Capital On Wages: Estimates For The United States, 1979-1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 907-940, August.
  10. Agrawal, Ajay & Kapur, Devesh & McHale, John & Oettl, Alexander, 2011. "Brain drain or brain bank? The impact of skilled emigration on poor-country innovation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 43-55, January.
  11. Maré, Dave C. & Fabling, Richard & Stillman, Steven, 2011. "Immigration and Innovation," IZA Discussion Papers 5686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Ceren Ozgen & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2011. "Immigration And Innovation In European Regions," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011008, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  13. James Harrigan, 1996. "Technology, Factor Supplies and International Specialization: Estimating the Neoclassical Model," NBER Working Papers 5722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Mary O'Mahony & Marcel P. Timmer, 2009. "Output, Input and Productivity Measures at the Industry Level: The EU KLEMS Database," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(538), pages F374-F403, 06.
  15. Hummels, David & Ishii, Jun & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2001. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 75-96, June.
  16. Kei-Mu Yi, 2000. "Can vertical specialization explain the growth of world trade?," Staff Reports 96, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  17. Lorenzo Caliendo & Fernando Parro, 2012. "Estimates of the Trade and Welfare Effects of NAFTA," NBER Working Papers 18508, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Christian Reiner, 2010. "Brain competition policy as a new paradigm of regional policy: A European perspective," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 449-461, 06.
  19. Johnson, Robert C. & Noguera, Guillermo, 2012. "Accounting for intermediates: Production sharing and trade in value added," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 224-236.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_161. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Julio Saavedra)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.