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Transition from school to first job: the influence of educational attainment

  • J Taylor
  • A N Nguyen

This paper investigates the transition from high school to first job using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1988-2000. A proportional hazards model is estimated to identify the determinants of time-to-first-job. In contrast to earlier studies, there is strong evidence of positive duration dependence after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Time-to-first-job is correlated with educational attainment and type of school program attended. Attending a vocational program reduces time-to-first-job, but dropouts who obtain the General Educational Development qualification do not improve their chances of getting a job more quickly. Family background is insignificant.

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Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 540112.

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Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:540112
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