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Did Bologna reform improve school-to-work transition of graduates? Evidence from Slovenia

In: Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6

Author

Listed:
  • Polona Domadenik

    () (University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Economics)

  • Dasa Farcnik

    () (University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Economics)

Abstract

Purpose: This paper investigates the school-to-work transition of graduates in a framework of a quazi experiment. In a predominately tuition free system we use differences in probability of employment after graduation to infer about the causal effect of different field of study and type of study program.Design/methodology/approach: By using a probit regression we calculate the probability of employment for graduates in different fields of education and different type of study program, where we control for the innate ability and effort during schooling.Findings: We find that graduating from a particular field of study affects the probability of employment in three consequent observed years. In general we find, that regardless of the field we observe decreasing probabilities of employment over the years of 2008 and 2009. We also find that new graduates holding a diploma from new vocational or academic Bologna programs face lower probability of employment comparing to graduates having a pre-Bologna degree.Practical implications: In the absence of price competition, performance indicators such as employability can provide relevant information to student choice or a management tool for efficient distribution of education funds to measured performance.Originality/value: By covering the entire population of full-time graduates in 2007, 2008 and 2009 that entered labor market for the first time after graduation we calculate probability of employment in the three consequent years allowing us to first infer about the effect of the new Bologna-harmonized programs and second infer about the crisis impact. In addition we investigate the effect of the quarter of year on the probability of employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Polona Domadenik & Dasa Farcnik, 2011. "Did Bologna reform improve school-to-work transition of graduates? Evidence from Slovenia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 40, pages 649-665 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
  • Handle: RePEc:aec:ieed06:06-40
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. MacLeod, Bentley, 2009. "Anti-Lemons: School Reputation and Educational Quality," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt3rc708kd, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    2. Lena Lindahl & Hakan Regnér, 2005. "College Choice and Subsequent Earnings: Results Using Swedish Sibling Data," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(3), pages 437-457, September.
    3. Kelly, Elish & O'Connell, Philip J. & Smyth, Emer, 2010. "The economic returns to field of study and competencies among higher education graduates in Ireland," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 650-657, August.
    4. repec:lan:wpaper:4769 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Arcidiacono, Peter, 2004. "Ability sorting and the returns to college major," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 343-375.
    6. Betts, Julian & Ferrall, Christopher & Finnie, Ross, 2000. "The Transition to Work for Canadian University Graduates: Time to First Job, 1982-1990," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000141e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    7. Simone Tuor & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2008. "Risk-Return Trade-Offs to Complete Educational Paths: Vocational, Academic and Mixed," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0031, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    8. Genda, Yuji & Kurosawa, Masako, 2001. "Transition from School to Work in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 465-488, December.
    9. Dominic J. Brewer & Eric Eide & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1996. "Does It Pay To Attend An Elite Private College? Cross Cohort Evidence on the Effects of College Quality on Earnings," NBER Working Papers 5613, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    11. Loury, Linda Datcher & Garman, David, 1995. "College Selectivity and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 289-308, April.
    12. A N Nguyen & J Taylor, 2005. "From school to first job: a longitudinal analysis," Working Papers 565907, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
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    14. Steve Bradley & Anh Ngoc Nguyen, 2004. "The School-to-Work Transition," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Education, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school-to-work transition; employability; Bologna Declaration;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General

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