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University selectivity and earnings: Evidence from UK data on applications and admissions to university

  • Broecke, Stijn

This paper estimates the returns to university selectivity in the UK using administrative data on applications and admissions to university, linked to a survey of graduates three and a half years after graduation. It compares students who indicated preferences for, and were conditionally accepted to, the same universities – but who attended different ones because some failed to meet the conditions of their preferred offer. The results suggest that one standard deviation in selectivity leads to a 7% increase in earnings.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 31 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 96-107

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:31:y:2012:i:3:p:96-107
DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.02.005
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  1. Lindahl, Lena & Regnér, Håkan, 2003. "College choice and subsequent earnings. Results using Swedish sibling data," Working Paper Series 4/2003, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  2. Stacy Dale & Alan B. Krueger, 2011. "Estimating the Return to College Selectivity over the Career Using Administrative Earnings Data," NBER Working Papers 17159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Iftikhar Hussain & Sandra McNally & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2009. "University quality and graduate wages in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25486, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Black, Dan A. & Smith, J.A.Jeffrey A., 2004. "How robust is the evidence on the effects of college quality? Evidence from matching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 99-124.
  5. Kevin Lang & Erez Siniver, 2011. "Why Is an Elite Undergraduate Education Valuable? Evidence from Israel," NBER Working Papers 16730, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Dominic J. Brewer & Eric R. Eide & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1999. "Does It Pay to Attend an Elite Private College? Cross-Cohort Evidence on the Effects of College Type on Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 104-123.
  7. Monks, James, 2000. "The returns to individual and college characteristics: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 279-289, June.
  8. Stacy Berg Dale & Alan B. Krueger, 1999. "Estimating the Payoff to Attending a More Selective College: An Application of Selection on Observables and Unobservables," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 4bafb729911e486baf90b34c9, Mathematica Policy Research.
  9. Dolton, P. J. & Vignoles, A., 2002. "Is a broader curriculum better?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 415-429, October.
  10. Arnaud Chevalier & Gavan Conlon, 2003. "Does it pay to attend a prestigious university?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19477, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Belfield, C. R. & Fielding, A., 2001. "Measuring the relationship between resources and outcomes in higher education in the UK," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 589-602, December.
  12. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith, 2006. "Estimating the Returns to College Quality with Multiple Proxies for Quality," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 701-728, July.
  13. Dan Black & Jeffrey Smith & Kermit Daniel, 2005. "College Quality and Wages in the United States," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(3), pages 415-443, 08.
  14. Mark Hoekstra, 2009. "The Effect of Attending the Flagship State University on Earnings: A Discontinuity-Based Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 717-724, November.
  15. Berhman, J-R & Kletzer, L & Constantine, J & McPherson, M & Schapiro, M-O, 1996. "The Impact of College Quality on Wages : Are There Differences Among Demographic Groups?," Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education DP-38, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  16. repec:mpr:mprres:6922 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1996. "College Choice and Wages: Estimates Using Data on Female Twins," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 672-85, November.
  18. Long, Mark C., 2008. "College quality and early adult outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 588-602, October.
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