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The Rising Postgraduate Wage Premium

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  • Joanne Lindley
  • Stephen Machin

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  • Joanne Lindley & Stephen Machin, 2016. "The Rising Postgraduate Wage Premium," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 281-306, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:83:y:2016:i:330:p:281-306
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecca.12184
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    11. Lindley, Joanne & McIntosh, Steven, 2015. "Growth in within graduate wage inequality: The role of subjects, cognitive skill dispersion and occupational concentration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 101-111.
    12. David H. Autor & David Dorn, 2013. "The Growth of Low-Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the US Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1553-1597, August.
    13. Guido Matias Cortes & Nir Jaimovich & Christopher J. Nekarda & Henry E. Siu, 2014. "The Micro and Macro of Disappearing Routine Jobs: A Flows Approach," NBER Working Papers 20307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    27. Guy Michaels & Ashwini Natraj & John Van Reenen, 2014. "Has ICT Polarized Skill Demand? Evidence from Eleven Countries over Twenty-Five Years," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(1), pages 60-77, March.
    28. Bedard, Kelly & Herman, Douglas A., 2008. "Who goes to graduate/professional school? The importance of economic fluctuations, undergraduate field, and ability," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 197-210, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Berkes, Jan & Peter, Frauke & Spiess, C. Katharina & Weinhardt, Felix, 2019. "Information Provision and Postgraduate Studies," IZA Discussion Papers 12735, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Balogh, Gábor & Sipos, Norbert, 2019. "Pályakezdő közgazdászok bére a szakdiverzifikáció függvényében [Programme diversification effects on the salaries of freshly graduated economists]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 551-577.
    3. Almeida, André & Figueiredo, Hugo & Cerejeira, João & Portela, Miguel & Sá, Carla & Teixeira, Pedro, 2017. "Returns to Postgraduate Education in Portugal: Holding on to a Higher Ground?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 44, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Shiri M. Breznitz & Qiantao Zhang, 2020. "Determinants of graduates’ entrepreneurial activity," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 55(4), pages 1039-1056, December.
    5. Giovanni Marin & Francesco Vona, 2017. "Finance and the Misallocation of Scientific, Engineering and Mathematical Talent," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2017-27, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    6. Walker, Ian & Zhu, Yu, 2018. "University selectivity and the relative returns to higher education: Evidence from the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 230-249.
    7. Giampaolo Arachi & Michele G Giuranno & Paola Profeta, 2018. "Introduction to the Special Issue ‘Inequality and Public Policies’, CESifo Economic Studies 2018," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(3), pages 339-344.
    8. Mamiko Takeuchi, 2019. "Earnings gaps among higher-educated workers withinmain cities insemi-industrializedandnewly industrialized Asian countries," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 19-06-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Jul 2019.
    9. Shiri M. Breznitz & Qiantao Zhang, 0. "Determinants of graduates’ entrepreneurial activity," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-18.
    10. Adam James Berg, 2019. "Skills tasks, and class- an integrated class based approach to understanding recent trends in economic inequality in the USA," Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 117-138, June.
    11. Nam, Yunju, 2020. "Parents’ financial assistance for college and black-white disparities in post-secondary educational attainment," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).
    12. Gu, Ran, 2019. "Specific Human Capital and Real Wage Cyclicality: An Application to Postgraduate Wage Premium," MPRA Paper 98027, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Joseph G. Altonji & Ling Zhong, 2020. "The Labor Market Returns to Advanced Degrees," NBER Working Papers 26959, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jacek Liwiński, 2017. "Premia płacowa z kształcenia na studiach podyplomowych," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 5, pages 105-127.

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