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Growth in within graduate wage inequality: The role of subjects, cognitive skill dispersion and occupational concentration

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  • Lindley, Joanne
  • McIntosh, Steven

Abstract

Increasing participation in Higher Education, and the rising number of graduates in the labour markets of most developed countries, are likely to alter graduate wage distributions. Increasing wage inequality amongst graduates has been observed in a number of countries. This paper takes as an example the UK, where the increase in inequality has been amongst the highest, to investigate any potential link between these two phenomena of participation and inequality. Dividing graduates by subject of degree to provide more variation, we show that most of the increase in graduate wage inequality has occurred within subjects. We investigate two potential explanations, specifically the increase in the variance of childhood cognitive test scores amongst graduates in the same subject, and the widening variety of jobs performed by graduates with degrees in the same subject. The paper shows that both of these factors have played a role in explaining growing graduate wage inequality within subjects, though the largest is by far from the increased variance of test scores. The results also show that mean test scores are falling over time within every subject to a greater or lesser extent, suggesting that the widening variance of test scores is due to universities accepting individuals from lower in the ability distribution, as Higher Education participation has expanded.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindley, Joanne & McIntosh, Steven, 2015. "Growth in within graduate wage inequality: The role of subjects, cognitive skill dispersion and occupational concentration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 101-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:37:y:2015:i:c:p:101-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2015.03.015
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    Cited by:

    1. Joanne Lindley & Stephen Machin, 2016. "The Rising Postgraduate Wage Premium," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 281-306, April.
    2. Joanne Lindley & Steven Mcintosh, 2017. "Finance Sector Wage Growth and the Role of Human Capital," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(4), pages 570-591, August.
    3. Reinhold, Mario & Thomsen, Stephan, 2015. "Patterns of Labour Market Entry of High-Skilled Workers in Germany," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113018, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage inequality; Subject of degree; Graduates;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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