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Does attending elite colleges pay in China?

Author

Listed:
  • Li, Hongbin
  • Meng, Lingsheng
  • Shi, Xinzheng
  • Wu, Binzhen

Abstract

We estimate the return to attending elite colleges in China using 2010 data on fresh college graduates. We find that the gross return to attending elite colleges is as high as 26.4%, but this figure declines to 10.7% once we control for student ability, major, college location, individual characteristics, and family background. The wage premium is larger for female students and students with better-educated fathers. We also find that the human capital and experiences accumulated in elite colleges can explain almost all the wage premium.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Hongbin & Meng, Lingsheng & Shi, Xinzheng & Wu, Binzhen, 2012. "Does attending elite colleges pay in China?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 78-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:40:y:2012:i:1:p:78-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jce.2011.10.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yang, Guangliang, 2014. "Are all admission sub-tests created equal? — Evidence from a National Key University in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 600-617.
    2. Yang, Fanzheng & Yu, Li, 2016. "With or without siblings: Sorting into competition in the experimental labor market," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 284-298.
    3. Liu, Ling & Wan, Qian, 2017. "The Effect of Education Expansion on Intergenerational Mobility of Education: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 80616, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Zurab Abramishvili & Lasha Lanchava, 2015. "Education for the Poor," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp542, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    5. Guo, Qian & Sun, Wenkai, 2014. "Economic returns to English proficiency for college graduates in mainland China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 290-300.
    6. Song, Yang, 2017. "Sorting, School Performance and Quality: Evidence from China," Working Papers 2018-01, Department of Economics, Colgate University, revised 20 Mar 2018.
    7. Wu, Binzhen & Zhong, Xiaohan, 2014. "Matching mechanisms and matching quality: Evidence from a top university in China," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 196-215.
    8. Hongbin Li & Prashant Loyalka & Scott Rozelle & Binzhen Wu, 2017. "Human Capital and China's Future Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 25-48, Winter.
    9. Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2013. "Economic returns to schooling for China's Korean minority," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 89-102.
    10. Wenshu Gao & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Returns to Schooling in Urban China, 2001-2010: Evidence from Three Waves of the China Urban Labor Survey," Monash Economics Working Papers 50-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elite college; First job wage; Wage premium; China;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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