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The Transition to Work for Canadian University Graduates: Time to First Job, 1982-1990

Author

Listed:
  • Betts, Julian
  • Ferrall, Christopher
  • Finnie, Ross

Abstract

Using three waves (1982, 1986, 1990) of the National Graduate Survey (NGS) we analyze the time it takes graduates of Canadian universities to start a full time job that lasts six months or more. We analyze duration to first job using the Cox proportional hazards model. Our results suggest large differences in the speed of the transition to work both within and between cohorts. They also suggest that the differences in duration to first job across NGS cohorts are not just driven by differences in business cycle conditions at the time of graduation. Over certain segments of duration the patterns of job-starting are similar across cohorts. Within cohorts the differences in the school-to-work transition across certain demographic groups are small, and for some the differences remain stable across cohorts.

Suggested Citation

  • Betts, Julian & Ferrall, Christopher & Finnie, Ross, 2000. "The Transition to Work for Canadian University Graduates: Time to First Job, 1982-1990," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000141e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2000141e
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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2000141&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zvi Eckstein & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1995. "Duration to First Job and the Return to Schooling: Estimates from a Search-Matching Model," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 263-286.
    2. Julian Betts & Christopher Ferrall & Ross Finnie, 2006. "The Role of University Characteristics in Determining Post-Graduation Outcomes: Panel Evidence from Three Recent Canadian Cohorts," Working Papers 1055, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    3. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
    4. Ferrall, Christopher, 1997. "Unemployment Insurance Eligibility and the School-to-Work Transition in Canada and the United States," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(2), pages 115-129, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. J Taylor & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Transition from school to first job: the influence of educational attainment," Working Papers 540112, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    2. Aurora Galego & António Caleiro, 2009. "Understanding the Transition to Work for First Degree University Graduates in Portugal: The case of the University of Évora," Economics Working Papers 06_2009, University of Évora, Department of Economics (Portugal).
    3. Polona Domadenik & Dasa Farcnik, 2011. "Did Bologna reform improve school-to-work transition of graduates? Evidence from Slovenia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 40, pages 649-665 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    4. repec:wsi:medjxx:v:02:y:2010:i:01:n:s1793812010000162 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Gartell, Marie, 2009. "Unemployment and subsequent earnings for Swedish college graduates: a study of scarring effects," Working Paper Series 2009:10, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

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