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The School-to-Work Transition

In: International Handbook on the Economics of Education

Author

Listed:
  • Steve Bradley
  • Anh Ngoc Nguyen

Abstract

This major Handbook comprehensively surveys the rapidly growing field of the economics of education. It is unique in that it comprises original contributions on an exceptional range of topics from a review of human capital, signalling and screening models, to consideration of issues such as educational externalities and economic growth, funding models, determinants of educational success, the educational production function, educational standards and efficiency measurement. Labour market issues such as the market for teachers and the transition of students from school to work are also explored.

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Bradley & Anh Ngoc Nguyen, 2004. "The School-to-Work Transition," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Education, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:2847_13
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Björn Nilsson, 2017. "The School-to-work transition in developing countries," Working Papers DT/2017/07, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    2. repec:aio:aucsse:v:1:y:2017:i:45:p:82-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Iain Embrey, 2017. "States of Nature and States of Mind: A Generalised Theory of Decision-Making, evaluated by application to Human Capital Development," Working Papers 209919485, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    4. Kathrin Bertschy & Alejandra Cattaneo & Stefan C. Wolter, 2008. "What happened to the PISA 2000 participants five years later?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0013, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    5. Polona Domadenik & Dasa Farcnik, 2011. "Did Bologna reform improve school-to-work transition of graduates? Evidence from Slovenia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 40, pages 649-665 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    6. Kong Jun & Jiang Fan, 2011. "Factors Affecting Job Opportunities for University Graduates in China---the Evidence from University Graduates in Beijing," Research in World Economy, Research in World Economy, Sciedu Press, vol. 2(1), pages 24-37, April.
    7. Steven Bradley & Robert Crouchley, 2017. "The effects of test scores and truancy on youth unemployment and inactivity: A simultaneous equations approach," Working Papers 189398493, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    8. Teijeiro, Mercedes & Rungo, Paolo & Freire, Mª Jesús, 2013. "Graduate competencies and employability: The impact of matching firms’ needs and personal attainments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 286-295.
    9. Daša Farcnik & Polona Domadenik, 2012. "Has the Bologna reform enhanced the employability of graduates? Early evidence from Slovenia," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 51-75, March.

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    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Education;

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