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The Transition to Work for Italian University Graduates

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  • Dario Pozzoli

Abstract

This study is focused on the transition from university to first job, taking into account the graduates’ characteristics and the effects relating to degree subject. A large data set from a survey on job opportunities for the 1998 Italian graduates is used. The paper uses a non‐parametric discrete‐time single‐risk model to study employment hazard. Alternative mixing distributions have also been used to account for unobserved heterogeneity. The results obtained indicate that there is evidence of positive duration dependence after a short initial period of negative duration dependence. In addition, a competing‐risk model has been estimated to characterize transitions out of unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Dario Pozzoli, 2009. "The Transition to Work for Italian University Graduates," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(1), pages 131-169, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:1:p:131-169
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9914.2008.00442.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Tomasz Zgrzywa & Joanna Tyrowicz & Stanisław Cichocki, 2017. "Czynniki wpływające na czas poszukiwania pierwszego zatrudnienia," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 6, pages 31-56.
    2. Marelli Enrico & Sciulli Dario & Signorelli Marcello, 2014. "Skill mismatch of graduates in a local labour market," Экономика региона, CyberLeninka;Федеральное государственное бюджетное учреждение науки «Институт экономики Уральского отделения Российской академии наук», issue 2, pages 181-194.
    3. Baert, Stijn & Cockx, Bart, 2013. "Pure ethnic gaps in educational attainment and school to work transitions: When do they arise?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 276-294.
    4. Akram Sh. Alawad & Fuad Kreishan & Mohammad Selim, 2020. "Determinants of Youth Unemployment: Evidence from Jordan," International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), vol. 0(4), pages 152-165.
    5. Manuel Bagues & Mauro Sylos Labini & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2008. "Differential Grading Standards and University Funding: Evidence from Italy," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 54(2), pages 149-176.
    6. Yang, Lijun, 2018. "Higher education expansion and post-college unemployment: Understanding the roles of fields of study in China," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 62-74.
    7. Adriana Monte & Gabriella Schoier, 2015. "A statistical analysis on the transition from university to labour market," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - The Italian Journal of Economic, Demographic and Statistical Studies, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 69(1), pages 111-118, January-M.
    8. Aurora Galego & António Caleiro, 2009. "Understanding the Transition to Work for First Degree University Graduates in Portugal: The case of the University of Évora," Economics Working Papers 06_2009, University of Évora, Department of Economics (Portugal).
    9. Sandra De Iaco & Sabrina Maggio & Donato Posa, 2019. "A Multilevel Multinomial Model for the Dynamics of Graduates Employment in Italy," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 146(1), pages 149-168, November.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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