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Do Business Visits Cause Productivity Growth?

Author

Listed:
  • Tani, Massimiliano

    () (University of New South Wales)

  • Joyeux, Roselyne

    () (Macquarie University, Sydney)

Abstract

The production and diffusion of knowledge have increasingly been seen as potential causes of the observed international differences in total factor productivity and, in turn, as possible sources of economic growth. This paper presents the results of a causality study between business visits and multifactor productivity using a unique database that covers 30 sectors for 17 countries over the period 1998-2007. The results suggest that there is a causal link in some of the most innovative sectors from business visits to productivity. Business visits emerge as a fundamental channel for the spread of knowledge.

Suggested Citation

  • Tani, Massimiliano & Joyeux, Roselyne, 2013. "Do Business Visits Cause Productivity Growth?," IZA Discussion Papers 7827, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7827
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    international business travels; panel data; causality tests;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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