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The economic effects of basic research: evidence for embodied knowledge transfer via scientists' migration


  • Zellner, Christian


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  • Zellner, Christian, 2003. "The economic effects of basic research: evidence for embodied knowledge transfer via scientists' migration," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1881-1895, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:32:y:2003:i:10:p:1881-1895

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Anders Ekeland & et al., "undated". "Mobility from the research sector in the Nordic countries," STEP Report series 200312, The STEP Group, Studies in technology, innovation and economic policy.
    2. Salter, Ammon J. & Martin, Ben R., 2001. "The economic benefits of publicly funded basic research: a critical review," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 509-532, March.
    3. Pavitt, K, 2001. "Public Policies to Support Basic Research: What Can the Rest of the World Learn from US Theory and Practice? (And What They Should Not Learn)," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 761-779, September.
    4. David B. Audretsch & Paula E. Stephan, 1999. "Knowledge spillovers in biotechnology: sources and incentives," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 97-107.
    5. Klevorick, Alvin K. & Levin, Richard C. & Nelson, Richard R. & Winter, Sidney G., 1995. "On the sources and significance of interindustry differences in technological opportunities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 185-205, March.
    6. Mangematin, V., 2000. "PhD job market: professional trajectories and incentives during the PhD," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 741-756, June.
    7. Rosenberg,Nathan, 1994. "Exploring the Black Box," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521459556, March.
    8. Gibbons, Michael & Johnston, Ron, 1974. "The roles of science in technological innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 220-242, November.
    9. Partha, Dasgupta & David, Paul A., 1994. "Toward a new economics of science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 487-521, September.
    10. Nathan ROSENBERG, 2009. "Why do firms do basic research (with their own money)?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Studies On Science And The Innovation Process Selected Works of Nathan Rosenberg, chapter 11, pages 225-234 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    Cited by:

    1. Ulrich Witt & Christian Zellner, 2009. "How firm organizations adapt to secure a sustained knowledge transfer," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 647-661.
    2. Guido Buenstorf, 2006. "Is Academic Entrepreneurship Good or Bad for Science? Empirical Evidence from the Max Planck Society," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2006-17, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:94:y:2013:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-012-0783-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Di Maio, Giorgio & Landoni, Paolo, 2017. "Determinants of PhD holders’ use of social networking sites: An analysis based on LinkedIn," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 740-750.
    5. Hottenrott, Hanna & Lawson, Cornelia, 2014. "Flying the nest: How the home department shapes researchers’ career paths," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201409, University of Turin.
    6. Piva, Mariacristina & Tani, Massimiliano & Vivarelli, Marco, 2017. "The Productivity Impact of Business Mobility: International Evidence," GLO Discussion Paper Series 14, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:21:y:2017:i:04:n:s1363919617500311 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Mevissen, Natalie & Böttcher, Julia, 2011. "Aushandlung nach innen, Legitimation nach außen: Leibniz-Institute im Spannungsfeld zwischen Forschung und Anwendung," Discussion Papers, Research Group Science Policy Studies SP III 2011-602, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. David A. McGranahan & Timothy R. Wojan & Dayton M. Lambert, 2011. "The rural growth trifecta: outdoor amenities, creative class and entrepreneurial context -super-§," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 529-557, May.
    10. Peters, Bettina & Hud, Martin & Köhler, Christian & Licht, Georg, 2012. "Ökonomische Bewertung von staatlichen Investitionen in Forschung und Innovation," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 15-2012, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    11. Herrera, Liliana & Nieto, Mariano, 2016. "PhD careers in Spanish industry: Job determinants in manufacturing versus non-manufacturing firms," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 113(PB), pages 341-351.
    12. Piva, Mariacristina & Tani, Massimiliano & Vivarelli, Marco, 2016. "Business Visits, Knowledge Diffusion and Productivity," IZA Discussion Papers 10421, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Bastien Bernela & Olivier Bouba-Olga, 2013. "Le recrutement des universitaires français : de la question du localisme à celle de l'inertie spatiale," Working Papers hal-00821075, HAL.
    14. Nilsen, Vetle & Anelli, Giovanni, 2016. "Knowledge transfer at CERN," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 113-120.
    15. Herrera, Liliana & Muñoz-Doyague, Maria Felisa & Nieto, Mariano, 2010. "Mobility of public researchers, scientific knowledge transfer, and the firm's innovation process," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(5), pages 510-518, May.
    16. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    17. Tani, Massimiliano & Joyeux, Roselyne, 2013. "Do Business Visits Cause Productivity Growth?," IZA Discussion Papers 7827, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. repec:spr:scient:v:113:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2477-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Piva, Mariacristina & Tani, Massimiliano & Vivarelli, Marco, 2017. "Labour mobility through business visits as a way to foster productivity," MERIT Working Papers 004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    20. Michael Fritsch & Stefan Krabel, 2012. "Ready to leave the ivory tower?: Academic scientists’ appeal to work in the private sector," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 271-296, June.
    21. Henk F. Moed & Gali Halevi, 2015. "Multidimensional assessment of scholarly research impact," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 66(10), pages 1988-2002, October.

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