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The contribution of (not so) public research to commercial innovations in the field of combinatorial chemistry


  • Malo, Stéphane


This paper examines the roles that publicly funded research play in the process of combinatorial drug discovery. It is shown that firms rely heavily on public research knowledge and, even more so, on education in organic chemistry, genomics and biochemistry. Publicly funded research also led to the creation of dozens of chemical-based companies, provided firms with an access to a larger network of innovators and generated important instruments and methods that are being used throughout the value chain of combinatorial drug discovery. The effects of public research, however, often look different depending on whether one sees them through the prism of larger or smaller firms, EU15 countries or the US, universities or other PROs.

Suggested Citation

  • Malo, Stéphane, 2009. "The contribution of (not so) public research to commercial innovations in the field of combinatorial chemistry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 957-970, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:38:y:2009:i:6:p:957-970

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Toole, Andrew A., 2012. "The impact of public basic research on industrial innovation: Evidence from the pharmaceutical industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 1-12.
    2. repec:spr:scient:v:102:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1458-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Toole, Andrew A., 2011. "The impact of public basic research on industrial innovation: Evidence from the pharmaceutical industry," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-063, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. James A. Cunningham & Vincent Mangematin & Conor O’Kane & Paul O’Reilly, 2016. "At the frontiers of scientific advancement: the factors that influence scientists to become or choose to become publicly funded principal investigators," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 778-797, August.
    5. Prettner, Klaus & Werner, Katharina, 2016. "Why it pays off to pay us well: The impact of basic research on economic growth and welfare," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(5), pages 1075-1090.


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