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Proximity and the Use of Public Science by Innovate European Firms

Author

Listed:
  • Geuna, Aldo

    (University of Sussex)

  • Anthony Arundel

Abstract

We use the results of a 1993 survey of EuropeÕs largest firms to explore the effect of proximity on knowledge flows from suppliers, customers, joint ventures, competitors and public research organisations to innovative firms. The focus is on the latter, since they are an essential component of National Innovation Systems. The importance of proximity for sourcing knowledge from public research increases with the quality and output of domestic public research organisations and declines with activity in the North American market, an increase in the firmÕs R&D expenditures, and the importance of codified knowledge to the firm.

Suggested Citation

  • Geuna, Aldo & Anthony Arundel, 2003. "Proximity and the Use of Public Science by Innovate European Firms," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 86, Royal Economic Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2003:86
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Breschi, Stefano & Lissoni, Francesco, 2001. "Knowledge Spillovers and Local Innovation Systems: A Critical Survey," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 975-1005, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    public research; knowledge flows; tacit knowledge; innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • L3 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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