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Knowledge about knowledge since Nelson & Winter: a mixed record

Progress in our understanding of the role of knowledge in the economy, based on Nelson and Winter's book published in 1982, has been mixed. It has been greatest when their concepts have been enriched by empirical evidence, often coming from outside evolutionary economics. It has been least when discussions have been mainly theoretical, and constrained within evolutionary economics.

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Paper provided by SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex in its series SPRU Working Paper Series with number 83.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jun 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sru:ssewps:83
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  1. Geels, Frank W., 2002. "Technological transitions as evolutionary reconfiguration processes: a multi-level perspective and a case-study," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1257-1274, December.
  2. Pavitt, Keith, 1998. "Technologies, Products and Organization in the Innovating Firm: What Adam Smith Tells Us and Joseph Schumpeter Doesn't," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 433-52, September.
  3. Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni, 2001. "Knowledge spillovers and local innovation systems: a critical survey," LIUC Papers in Economics 84, Cattaneo University (LIUC).
  4. Keith Pavitt, 2002. "Innovating routines in the business firm: what corporate tasks should they be accomplishing?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 117-133, February.
  5. Jaffe, Adam B, 1989. "Real Effects of Academic Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 957-70, December.
  6. Richardson, G B, 1972. "The Organisation of Industry," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(327), pages 883-96, September.
  7. Costa, Ionara & de Queiroz, Sergio Robles Reis, 2002. "Foreign direct investment and technological capabilities in Brazilian industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1431-1443, December.
  8. Brooks, Harvey, 1994. "The relationship between science and technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 477-486, September.
  9. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters, in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Patel, Pari & Pavitt, Keith, 1997. "The technological competencies of the world's largest firms: Complex and path-dependent, but not much variety," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 141-156, May.
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