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Technologies, Products and Organization in the Innovating Firm: What Adam Smith Tells Us and Joseph Schumpeter Doesn't


  • Pavitt, Keith


Adam Smith's insights into the increasingly specialized nature of knowledge production are crucially important in understanding the contemporary problems of managing innovating firms. Products and firms are based on an increasing range of fields of specialized technological understanding. Competition is not based on technological diversity, but on diversity and experimentation in products, etc. Firms rarely fail because of an inability to master a new field of technology, but because they do not succeed in matching the firm's systems of coordination and control to the nature of the available technological opportunities. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

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  • Pavitt, Keith, 1998. "Technologies, Products and Organization in the Innovating Firm: What Adam Smith Tells Us and Joseph Schumpeter Doesn't," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 433-452, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:7:y:1998:i:3:p:433-52

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Park, Rolla Edward & Mitchell, Bridger M. & Wetzel, Bruce M. & Alleman, James H., 1983. "Charging for local telephone calls : How household characteristics affect the distribution of calls in the GTE Illinois experiment," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 339-364, August.
    2. Gary Madden & Michael Simpson, 1997. "Residential broadband subscription demand: an econometric analysis of Australian choice experiment data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(8), pages 1073-1078.
    3. Panzar, John C & Wildman, Steven S, 1995. "Network Competition and the Provision of Universal Service," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 711-719.
    4. Madden, Gary, 1995. "Experimentation in Economics: An Overview of the Stated-Preference Experimental Design Method," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(64), pages 120-135, June.
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