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Secondary Schools with Televised Lessons: The Labor Market Returns of the Mexican Telesecundaria

Author

Listed:
  • Laia Navarro-Sola

    (Northwestern University)

Abstract

In areas with an insufficient supply of qualified teachers, delivering instruction through technology may be a solution to provide education. This paper analyzes the educational and labor market impacts of an expansion of junior secondary education in Mexico through schools using televised lessons, the telesecundarias. Exploiting their staggered rollout from 1968 to 2000, I show that for every additional telesecundaria per 50 children, ten students enroll in junior secondary education. I find that an additional year of education increases long-run income by 12.5–13.9%, driven partly by increased labor force participation and a shift away from agriculture and the informal sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Laia Navarro-Sola, 2021. "Secondary Schools with Televised Lessons: The Labor Market Returns of the Mexican Telesecundaria," Working Papers 2021-053, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2021-053
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/NavarroSola_2021_secondary-schools-televised-lessons.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Beam, Emily A. & Mukherjee, Priya & Navarro-Sola, Laia, 2022. "Lowering Barriers to Remote Education: Experimental Impacts on Parental Responses and Learning," IZA Discussion Papers 15596, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Emily Beam & Priya Mukherjee & Laia Navarro-Sola, 2022. "Lowering Barriers to Remote Education: Experimental Impacts on Parental Responses and Learning," Working Papers 2022-030, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    secondary education; educational attainment; returns to education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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