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The Change Of Fiscal Multiplier When Switching From Managed Exchange Rate Regime To Thefloating One

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  • Ekaterina Pyltsyna

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

This study investigated the change of government spending multiplier when switching from managed exchange rate regime to the floating exchange rate regime for emerging countries. It was found that on-impact multiplier in floating exchange rate regime is smaller by 0.5 than the one in the managed exchange rate regime. In addition, it was found that the openness of the economy affects values of government spending multipliers. Also, for the first time, micro-founded government spending multiplier was estimated for Russia. The study was conducted with the use of panel SVAR and DSGE models.

Suggested Citation

  • Ekaterina Pyltsyna, 2018. "The Change Of Fiscal Multiplier When Switching From Managed Exchange Rate Regime To Thefloating One," HSE Working papers WP BRP 206/EC/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:206/ec/2018
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal multiplier; government expenditures; exchange rate regime change; panel SVAR; DSGE; emerging countries; Russia.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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