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Gig-jobs: stepping stones or dead ends?

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  • Adermon, Adrian

    (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Hensvik, Lena

    (Uppsala university, Department of Economics)

Abstract

How useful is work experience from the gig economy for labor market entrants searching for traditional wage jobs? We conducted a correspondence study in Sweden, comparing callback rates for recent high school graduates with (i)gig-experience, (ii) traditional experience, and (iii)unemployment history. We also study heterogeneous responses with respect to perceived foreign background. Our findings suggest that gig-experience is more valuable than unemployment, but less useful than traditional experience for majority applicants. Strikingly however, no form of labor market experience increases the callback rate for minority workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Adermon, Adrian & Hensvik, Lena, 2020. "Gig-jobs: stepping stones or dead ends?," Working Paper Series 2020:23, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2020_023
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    Cited by:

    1. Ek, Simon & Hammarstedt, Mats & Skedinger, Per, 2021. "Low-Skilled Jobs, Language Proficiency and Refugee Integration: An Experimental Study," Working Paper Series 1398, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Zuzanna Kowalik & Piotr Lewandowski & Paweł Kaczmarczyk, 2022. "Job quality gaps between migrant and native gig workers: evidence from Poland," IBS Working Papers 09/2022, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gig-jobs; correspondence study; discriminatio;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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