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An Analysis of the Labor Market for Uber's Driver-Partners in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan V. Hall

    (Uber Technologies)

  • Alan B. Krueger

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

This paper provides the first comprehensive analysis of Uber's driver-partners, based on both survey data and anonymized, aggregated administrative data. Uber has grown at an exponential rate over the last few years, and drivers who partner with Uber appear to be attracted to the platform in large part because of the flexibility it offers, the level of compensation, and the fact that earnings per hour do not vary much with hours worked, which facilitates part-time and variable hours. Uber's driver-partners are more similar in terms of their age and education to the general workforce than to taxi drivers and chauffeurs. Uber may serve as a bridge for many seeking other employment opportunities, and it may attract well-qualified individuals because, with Uber's star rating system, driver-partners' reputations are explicitly shared with potential customers. Most of Uber's driver-partners had full- or part-time employment prior to joining Uber, and many continued in those positions after starting to drive with the Uber platform, which makes the flexibility to set their own hours all the more valuable. Uber's driver-partners also often cited the desire to smooth fluctuations in their income as a reason for partnering with Uber.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan V. Hall & Alan B. Krueger, 2015. "An Analysis of the Labor Market for Uber's Driver-Partners in the United States," Working Papers 587, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:587
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Uber;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • L62 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Automobiles; Other Transportation Equipment; Related Parts and Equipment

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