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The Difficult School-to-Work Transition of High School Dropouts: Evidence from a field experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Cahuc, Pierre
  • Carcillo, Stéphane
  • Minea, Andreea

This paper investigates the effects of the labor market experience of high school dropouts four years after leaving school by sending fictitious resumes to real job postings in France. Compared to those who have stayed unemployed since leaving school, the callback rate is not raised for those with employment experience, whether it is subsidized or non-subsidized, in the market or non-market sector, if there is no training accompanied by skill certification. In particular, we find no stigma effect associated with subsidized or non-market sector work experience. Moreover, training accompanied by skill certification improves youth prospects only when the local unemployment rate is sufficiently low, which occurs in one fifth of the commuting zones only.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 12120.

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Date of creation: Jun 2017
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12120
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  1. David Card & Jochen Kluve & Andrea Weber, 2010. "Active Labour Market Policy Evaluations: A Meta-Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(548), pages 452-477, November.
  2. Florent Fremigacci & Rémi Le Gall & Yannick L'Horty & Pascale Petit, 2016. "Le Conformisme Des Recruteurs : Une Experience Controlee," Working Papers halshs-01374419, HAL.
  3. Henry S. Farber & Dan Silverman & Till von Wachter, 2016. "Determinants of Callbacks to Job Applications: An Audit Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 314-318, May.
  4. Kluve, Jochen, 2010. "The effectiveness of European active labor market programs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 904-918, December.
  5. Stefan Eriksson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2014. "Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 1014-1039, March.
  6. Hujer, Reinhard & Caliendo, Marco & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2004. "New evidence on the effects of job creation schemes in Germany--a matching approach with threefold heterogeneity," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 257-302, December.
  7. Card, David & Kluve, Jochen & Weber, Andrea, 2015. "What works? A meta analysis of recent active labor market program evaluations," Ruhr Economic Papers 572, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  8. David H. Autor & Susan N. Houseman & Sari Pekkala Kerr, 2017. "The Effect of Work First Job Placements on the Distribution of Earnings: An Instrumental Variable Quantile Regression Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 149-190.
  9. Barbara Sianesi, 2002. "Swedish active labour market programmes in the 1990s: overall effectiveness and differential performance," IFS Working Papers W02/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Isabelle Benoteau, 2015. "Quels effets du recrutement en contrat aidé sur la trajectoire professionnelle ? Une évaluation à partir du Panel 2008," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 477(1), pages 85-129.
  11. Jochen Kluve & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2002. "Can training and employment subsidies combat European unemployment?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(35), pages 409-448, October.
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