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Domestic trade and market size in late eighteenth century France

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  • Guillaume Daudin

    () (OFCE - OFCE - Sciences Po)

Abstract

This paper checks if differences in market size can explain the retardation of the Industrial Revolution in France compared to Britain. It uses an exceptional source on French domestic trade in a variety of goods in the late eighteenth century: the Tableaux du Maximum. The first part presents this source and the data. The second part checks if the data are plausible using a logit theoretical gravity equation. The third part uses the results of this gravity equation to compute the expected markets size of specific supply centres. For all types of high value-to-weight goods, some French supply centres reached 25 million people or more. For all types of textile groups, some French supply centres reached 20 million people or more. Even taking into account differences in real, nominal and disposable income per capita, these supply centres had access to domestic markets that were at least as large as the whole of Britain. Differences in the size of foreign markets were too small to reverse that result.

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  • Guillaume Daudin, 2007. "Domestic trade and market size in late eighteenth century France," Working Papers hal-01065991, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01065991 Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-sciencespo.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01065991
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mara P. Squicciarini & Nico Voigtländer, 2015. "Human Capital and Industrialization: Evidence from the Age of Enlightenment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(4), pages 1825-1883.
    2. Franck, Raphaël & Galor, Oded, 2015. "Is Industrialization Conducive to Long-Run Prosperity?," IZA Discussion Papers 9158, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Réka Juhász, 2014. "Temporary Protection and Technology Adoption: Evidence from the Napoleonic Blockade," CEP Discussion Papers dp1322, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
    5. Raphaël Franck & Stelios Michalopoulos, 2017. "Emigration during the French Revolution: Consequences in the Short and Longue Durée," NBER Working Papers 23936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Franck, Raphael & Galor, Oded, 2017. "Industrial Development and Long-Run Prosperity," CEPR Discussion Papers 12278, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Juhász, Réka, 2014. "Temporary protection and technology adoption: evidence from the Napoleonic blockade," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60697, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Daniel M. Bernhofen & Markus Eberhardt & Jianan Li & Stephen Morgan, 2015. "Assessing Market (Dis)Integration in Early Modern China and Europe," CESifo Working Paper Series 5580, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Paul A. David & S. Ryan Johansson & Andrea Pozzi, 2010. "The Demography of an Early Mortality Transition: Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality Rates for Britain's Royals, 1500-1799," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _083, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    10. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2015. "The Complementary between Technology and Human Capital in the Early Phase of Industrialization," CESifo Working Paper Series 5485, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Foreign Trade Was Not an Engine of Growth," MPRA Paper 19723, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2017. "Technology-Skill Complementarity in Early Phases of Industrialization," NBER Working Papers 23197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Johnson, Noel, 2015. "Taxes, National Identity, and Nation Building: Evidence from France," MPRA Paper 63598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Veselov, D. & Yarkin, A., 2016. "Wealth Distribution and Political Conflict in the Model of Transition from Stagnation to Growth," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 30-60.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • N73 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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