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Path dependent border effects: the case of Poland's reunification (1918-1939)

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  • Wolf, Nikolaus

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  • Wolf, Nikolaus, 2005. "Path dependent border effects: the case of Poland's reunification (1918-1939)," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 414-438, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:42:y:2005:i:3:p:414-438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2000. "Non-Europe: The magnitude and causes of market fragmentation in the EU," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 136(2), pages 284-314, June.
    2. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 691-751, September.
    3. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    4. Feinstein, Charles H. & Temin, Peter & Toniolo, Gianni, 1997. "The European Economy Between the Wars," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774815.
    5. Volker Nitsch, 2000. "National borders and international trade: evidence from the European Union," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1091-1105, November.
    6. Hamilton, C.B. & Winters, L.A., 1992. "Opening Up International Trade in Eastern Europe," Papers 511, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
    7. John F. Helliwell, 1997. "National Borders, Trade and Migration," NBER Working Papers 6027, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Holger C. Wolf, 1997. "Patterns of Intra- and Inter-State Trade," NBER Working Papers 5939, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Shang-Jin Wei, 1996. "Intra-National versus International Trade: How Stubborn are Nations in Global Integration?," NBER Working Papers 5531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Carolyn L. Evans, 2003. "The Economic Significance of National Border Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1291-1312, September.
    11. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
    12. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum, 2002. "Technology, Geography, and Trade," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 1741-1779, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2009. "Was Germany Ever United? Evidence from Intra- and International Trade, 1885–1933," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 846-881, September.
    2. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian, 2006. "The impact of new borders on trade: World War I and the economic disintegration of Central Europe," Discussion Papers 2006/14, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    3. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian & Schulze, Max Stephan & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? Exploring a Natural Experiment on Border Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Wolf, Nikolaus & Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2005. "Harbingers of dissolution? Grain prices, borders and nationalism in the Habsburg economy before the First World War," Discussion Papers 2005/20, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    5. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2006. "Was Germany ever united? Borders and domestic trade, 1885 - 1933," Discussion Papers 2006/4, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    6. Nakajima, Kentaro, 2008. "Economic division and spatial relocation: The case of postwar Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 383-400, September.
    7. Max‐Stephan Schulze & Nikolaus Wolf, 2012. "Economic nationalism and economic integration: the Austro‐Hungarian Empire in the late nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(2), pages 652-673, May.
    8. Guillaume Daudin, 2010. "Domestic Trade and Market Size in Late 18th century France," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/b0ghejdpldr, Sciences Po.
    9. Daudin, Guillaume, 2010. "Domestic Trade and Market Size in Late-Eighteenth-Century France," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(03), pages 716-743, September.
    10. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2005. "Endowments vs market potential: what explains the relocation of industry after the Polish reunification 1918?," Discussion Papers 2005/18, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    11. Tirado, Daniel A. & Badia-Miró, Marc, 2012. "Economic integration and regional inequality in Iberia (1900-2000) : a geographical approach," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp12-03, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    12. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2006. "Local comparative advantage: agriculture and economic development in Poland 1870 - 1970," Discussion Papers 2006/15, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    13. Wolf, Nikolaus, 2007. "Scylla and Charybdis: the European economy and Poland's adherence to gold, 1928-1936," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19659, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    14. Missiaia, Anna, 2009. "Regional market integration in Italy during the unification (1832-1882)," Economic History Working Papers 27885, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    15. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/b0ghejdpldro9c499h4ajc937 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:exehis:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:37-70 is not listed on IDEAS

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