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The Economic Determinants of Ethnic Segregation in Post-War Britain

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  • David M. Engstrom

Abstract

Ethnic residential segregation is usually investigated using a constrained-choice approach. This study explains the variation in post-war Afro-Caribbean segregation in fifteen British cities by means of historical patterns of economic opportunity. Its dependent variable is newly available census data on residential segregation. It finds that the observed variation in segregation levels cannot be explained in terms of council housing policies or the passage of civil rights legislation from the mid-1960s, but rather by the interaction of New Commonwealth immigration and local labour and housing market conditions during the critical period 1951-1966.

Suggested Citation

  • David M. Engstrom, 1997. "The Economic Determinants of Ethnic Segregation in Post-War Britain," Economics Series Working Papers 1997-W12, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:1997-w12
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/2248/12paper.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Liam Brunt, 1999. "An Arbitrage Model in Crop Rotation in 18th Century England," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _032, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    2. Federico Varese & Meir Yaish, 1998. "Altruism: The Importance of being Asked. The Rescue of Jews in Nazi Europe," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _024, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Paul A. David & Gavin Wright, "undated". "General Purpose Technologies and Surges in Productivity: Historical Reflections on the Future of the ICT Revolution," Working Papers 99026, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    4. James Malcomson & Martin Chalkley, 2001. "Cost Sharing in Health Service Provision: An Empirical Assessment of Cost Savings," Economics Series Working Papers 69, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Federico Varese & Meir Yaish, 1998. "Altruism:The Importance of Being Asked. The Rescue of Jews in Nazi Europe," Economics Series Working Papers 1998-W24, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    6. J.Humphries & T. Leunig, 2007. "Cities, Market Integration and Going to Sea: Stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth-century England and Wales," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _066, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    7. Liam Brunt, 1999. "An Arbitrage Model in Crop Rotation in 18th Century England," Economics Series Working Papers 1999-W32, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Harry Pettit, 2014. "Cities Without Suburbs: A Census 2010 Perspective, 4th Edition," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(9), pages 1989-1991, September.
    9. repec:oxf:wpaper:69.2 is not listed on IDEAS

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