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Feedback spillovers across tasks, self-confidence and competitiveness

Author

Listed:
  • Ritwik Banerjee

    (IIMB - Indian Institute of Management Bangalore)

  • Nabanita Datta Gupta

    (Aarhus University [Aarhus])

  • Marie Claire Villeval

    (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Université de Lyon - UJM - Université Jean Monnet [Saint-Étienne] - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Université de Lyon - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon)

Abstract

Does feedback on success in a task increase individuals' beliefs about their chance to succeed in a subsequent, unrelated, task? Does feedback on failure have a symmetric effect? Is the distortion of beliefs, possibly due to motivated beliefs, mistakes in updating or the feeling of having a lucky day, heterogeneous across individuals, in particular according to their status in the society? Conducting an artefactual field experiment in India with participants from different castes, we show that feedback on success in a forced competition in a first task increases winners' self-confidence and competitiveness in the subsequent task. Such feedback spillovers on self-confidence are asymmetric and heterogeneous according to status and more likely for already more confident individuals.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Ritwik Banerjee & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Marie Claire Villeval, 2020. "Feedback spillovers across tasks, self-confidence and competitiveness," Post-Print halshs-02908182, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-02908182
    DOI: 10.1016/j.geb.2020.07.002
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02908182
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    1. Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah & Trieu, Chi & Willrodt, Jana, 2020. "Perceived Fairness and Consequences of Affirmative Action Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 13202, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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