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The Spillover Effects of Affirmative Action on Competitiveness and Unethical Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Ritwik Banerjee

    (IIMB - Indian Institute of Management [Bangalore])

  • Nabanita Datta Gupta

    (Aarhus University [Aarhus])

  • Marie Claire Villeval

    () (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Université de Lyon - UJM - Université Jean Monnet [Saint-Étienne] - Université de Lyon - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We conduct an artefactual field experiment to examine various spillover effects of Affirmative Action policies in the context of castes in India. We test a) if individuals who enter tournaments in the presence of Affirmative Action policies remain competitive after the policy has been removed, and b) whether having been exposed to the policy generates unethical behavior and spite against subjects from the category who has benefited from the policy. We find that these policies substantially increase the confidence and the competitiveness of the backward caste members. However, we find no spillover effect on confidence and competitiveness once Affirmative Action is withdrawn: any gain in competitiveness due to the policy is then entirely wiped out. Furthermore, the strong existing bias of the dominant category against the backward category is not significantly aggravated by Affirmative Action, except when individuals learn that they have lost the previous competition.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Ritwik Banerjee & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Marie Claire Villeval, 2018. "The Spillover Effects of Affirmative Action on Competitiveness and Unethical Behavior," Post-Print halshs-01658042, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01658042
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2017.10.022
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01658042
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    Cited by:

    1. Banerjee, Ritwik & Gupta, Nabanita Datta & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2018. "The spillover effects of affirmative action on competitiveness and unethical behavior," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 567-604.
    2. Julien Benistant & Marie Claire Villeval, 2017. "Unethical Behavior and Group Identity in Contests," Working Papers 1725, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    3. Ritwik Banerjee & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Marie Claire Villeval, 2018. "Self Confidence Spillovers and Motivated Beliefs," Economics Working Papers 2018-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    4. repec:eee:ecolet:v:159:y:2017:i:c:p:33-36 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Garbarino, Ellen & Slonim, Robert & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2016. "Loss Aversion and Lying Behavior: Theory, Estimation and Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 10395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Aurelie Dariel & Curtis Kephart & Nikos Nikiforakis & Christina Zenker, 2017. "Emirati women do not shy away from competition: evidence from a patriarchal society in transition," Journal of the Economic Science Association, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 3(2), pages 121-136, December.
    7. Victoire Girard, 2016. "Mandated political representation and crimes against the low castes," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Banerjee, Ritwik & Gupta, Nabanita Datta & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2018. "The spillover effects of affirmative action on competitiveness and unethical behavior," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 567-604.
    9. Maggian, Valeria & Montinari, Natalia, 2017. "The spillover effects of gender quotas on dishonesty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 33-36.
    10. Loukas Balafoutas & Brent J. Davis & Matthias Sutter, 2017. "How uncertainty and ambiguity in tournaments affect gender differences in competitive behavior," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2017_18, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Affirmative action Castes Competitiveness Unethical behavior Field experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects

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