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Financial Literacy and Attitudes to Cryptocurrencies

Author

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  • Georgios A. Panos
  • Tatja Karkkainen
  • Adele Atkinson

Abstract

We examine the relationship between financial literacy and attitudes to cryptocurrencies, using microdata from 15 countries. Our financial literacy proxy exerts a large negative effect on the probability of currently owning cryptocurrencies. The financially literate are also more likely to be aware of cryptocurrencies, and more likely to report that they do not intend to own them. We confirm the external validity of our financial literacy proxy and findings using data from a second novel survey of retail investors in 3 Asian countries. More financially literate retail investors are more likely not to have held any cryptocurrencies. We show that the relationship between financial literacy and attitudes to cryptocurrencies is moderated by a different perception of the financial risk involved in cryptocurrencies versus alternative instruments by the more financially literate. Our findings shed light on the demand for cryptocurrencies among the general population and suggest that it is largely driven by unsophisticated users.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgios A. Panos & Tatja Karkkainen & Adele Atkinson, 2020. "Financial Literacy and Attitudes to Cryptocurrencies," Working Papers 2020_26, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  • Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2020_26
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Literacy; Cryptocurrencies; Attitudes; Bitcoin; Financial Risk;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B26 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Financial Economics
    • D18 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Protection
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G53 - Financial Economics - - Household Finance - - - Financial Literacy

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