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Gender, Stock Market Participation and Financial Literacy

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Abstract

omen typically participate less than men in the stock market, while also scoring lower on financial literacy. We explore the link between the gender gap in stock market participation and financial literacy. Using survey data on a random sample of 1,300 individuals that is representative of the Swedish population, we show that controlling for basic financial literacy, essentially a measure of numeracy that does not require knowledge about the stock market, may explain a large part of the gender gap in stock market participation. We also find that women report being less risk taking than men. This gender gap in risk attitudes remains significant also when controlling for financial literacy.

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  • Almenberg, Johan & Dreber, Anna, 2011. "Gender, Stock Market Participation and Financial Literacy," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 737, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 18 Jun 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0737
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    Cited by:

    1. Neubert, Milena & Bannier, Christina E., 2016. "Actual and perceived financial sophistication and wealth accumulation: The role of education and gender," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145593, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Bannier, Christina E. & Neubert, Milena, 2016. "Gender differences in financial risk taking: The role of financial literacy and risk tolerance," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 130-135.
    3. Bannier, Christina E. & Schwarz, Milena, 2017. "Skilled but unaware of it: Occurrence and potential long-term effects of females' financial underconfidence," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168188, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Boschini, Anne & Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Muren, Astri & Ranehill, Eva, 2014. "Gender and economic preferences in a large random sample," Research Papers in Economics 2014:6, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    5. Pikulina, Elena & Renneboog, Luc & Tobler, Philippe N., 2017. "Overconfidence and investment: An experimental approach," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 175-192.
    6. Lereko Rasoaisi & Kalebe M. Kalebe, 2015. "Determinants of Financial Literacy among the National University of Lesotho Students," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(9), pages 1050-1060, September.
    7. Klapper, Leora & Lusardi, Annamaria & Panos, Georgios A., 2012. "Financial literacy and the financial crisis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5980, The World Bank.
    8. French, Declan & McKillop, Donal, 2016. "Financial literacy and over-indebtedness in low-income households," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-11.
    9. Bianchi, Milo, 2017. "Financial Literacy and Portfolio Dynamics," TSE Working Papers 17-808, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    10. Dumičić Ksenija & Žmuk Berislav, 2015. "Statistical Control Charts: Performances of Short Term Stock Trading in Croatia," Business Systems Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 6(1), pages 22-35, March.
    11. repec:eee:pacfin:v:43:y:2017:i:c:p:218-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Shen, Chung-Hua & Lin, Shih-Jie & Tang, De-Piao & Hsiao, Yu-Jen, 2016. "The relationship between financial disputes and financial literacy," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 46-65.
    13. Dorothea Schäfer, 2016. "Distributional Effects of Taxing Financial Transactions and the Low Interest Rate Environment," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1609, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Klapper, Leora & Lusardi, Annamaria & Panos, Georgios A., 2013. "Financial literacy and its consequences: Evidence from Russia during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3904-3923.
    15. Žmuk Berislav, 2016. "Capabilities of Statistical Residual-Based Control Charts in Short- and Long-Term Stock Trading," Naše gospodarstvo/Our economy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 62(1), pages 12-26, March.
    16. Agnese Romiti & Mariacristina Rossi, 2014. "Wealth decumulation, portfolio composition and financial literacy among European elderly," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 375, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    17. Annamaria Lusardi, 2012. "Numeracy, financial literacy, and financial decision-making," NBER Working Papers 17821, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Winter, Joachim & Lührmann, Melanie & Serra Garcia, Marta, 2013. "The effects of financial literacy training: Evidence from a field experiment in German high schools," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79744, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    stock market participation; gender; financial literacy; numeracy; risk attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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