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Financial Literacy: Thai Middle Class Women Do Not Lag behind

Author

Listed:
  • Antonia Grohmann
  • Olaf Hübler
  • Roy Kouwenberg
  • Lukas Menkhoff

Abstract

This research studies the stylized fact of a “gender gap” in that women tend to have lower financial literacy than men. Our data which samples middle-class people from Bangkok does not show a gender gap. This result is not explained by men’s low financial literacy, nor by women’s high income and good education. Rather, it seems influenced by country characteristics on general gender equality and finance-related equality, such as little gender gaps regarding pupils’ mathematics abilities or secondary school enrollment, and women’s strong role in financial affairs. This may indicate ways to reduce the gender gap in financial literacy elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonia Grohmann & Olaf Hübler & Roy Kouwenberg & Lukas Menkhoff, 2016. "Financial Literacy: Thai Middle Class Women Do Not Lag behind," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1615, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1615
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bannier, Christina E. & Schwarz, Milena, 2018. "Gender- and education-related effects of financial literacy and confidence on financial wealth," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 66-86.
    2. Grohmann, Antonia, 2018. "Financial literacy and financial behavior: Evidence from the emerging Asian middle class," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 129-143.
    3. Antonia Grohmann & Annekathrin Schoofs, 2018. "Financial Literacy and Intra-Household Decision Making: Evidence from Rwanda," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1720, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial literacy; financial behavior; gender gap; individual characteristics; societal norms; Thailand;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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