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Will Women Be Women? Analyzing the Gender Difference among Financial Experts

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  • Beckmann, Daniela
  • Menkhoff, Lukas

Abstract

There are robust gender differences in the domains of risk taking, overconfidence and competition behavior. However, as expertise tends to level these differences, we ask whether financial experts still show gender dissimilarities in their domains of decision making? We analyze survey responses of 649 fund managers in the U.S., Germany, Italy and Thailand, and find that female fund managers tend to behave as expected from gender studies: they are more risk averse and shy away from competition in the tournament scenario. The expected lower degree of overconfidence by women is yet so small that it becomes insignificant in fund management.

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  • Beckmann, Daniela & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2008. "Will Women Be Women? Analyzing the Gender Difference among Financial Experts," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-391, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  • Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-391
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    2. Cueva, Carlos & Rustichini, Aldo, 2015. "Is financial instability male-driven? Gender and cognitive skills in experimental asset markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 330-344.
    3. Julie A. Nelson, 2015. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse Than Men? A Re-Analysis Of The Literature Using Expanded Methods," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 566-585, July.
    4. Irene van Staveren, 2014. "The Lehman Sisters hypothesis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(5), pages 995-1014.
    5. Goodall, Amanda H. & Osterloh, Margit, 2015. "Women Have to Enter the Leadership Race to Win: Using Random Selection to Increase the Supply of Women into Senior Positions," IZA Discussion Papers 9331, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Thomas P. Gehrig & Torben Lütje & Lukas Menkhoff, 2009. "Bonus Payments and Fund Managers' Behavior: Transatlantic Evidence," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 55(3-4), pages 569-594.
    7. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Chisako Yamane & Shoko Yamane, 2014. "Effect of major disasters on geographical mobility intentions: the case of the Fukushima nuclear accident," ISER Discussion Paper 0903, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    8. Urs Fischbacher & Gerson Hoffmann & Simeon Schudy, 2017. "The Causal Effect of Stop-Loss and Take-Gain Orders on the Disposition Effect," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(6), pages 2110-2129.
    9. van Staveren, I.P., 2012. "The Lehman Sisters Hypothesis: an exploration of literature and bankers," ISS Working Papers - General Series 545, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    10. Nataliya Barasinska & Dorothea Schäfer, 2013. "Financial risk taking, gender and social identity - Evidence from national surveys of household finance," LWS Working papers 15, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    11. Kris Hardies & Diane Breesch & Joël Branson, 2011. "Male and female auditors' overconfidence," Managerial Auditing Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 105-118, November.
    12. Julie A. Nelson, 2012. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?," GDAE Working Papers 12-05, GDAE, Tufts University.
    13. Drupp, Moritz A. & Khadjavi, Menusch & Riekhof, Marie-Catherine & Voss, Rüdiger, 2017. "Professional identity and the gender gap in risk-taking: Evidence from a field experiment with scientists," Kiel Working Papers 2077, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    14. Koedijk, Kees & Pownall, Rachel A J & Statman, Meir, 2012. "Aspirations, Well-being, Risk-Aversion and Loss-Aversion," CEPR Discussion Papers 8904, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Antonia Grohmann & Olaf Hübler & Roy Kouwenberg & Lukas Menkhoff, 2016. "Financial Literacy: Thai Middle Class Women Do Not Lag behind," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1615, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Julie A. Nelson, 2011. "11-03 "Would Women Leaders Have Prevented the Global Financial Crisis? Implications for Teaching about Gender, Behavior, and Economics"," GDAE Working Papers 11-03, GDAE, Tufts University.
    17. Daniel Ştefan Armeanu & Georgeta Vintilă & Ştefan Cristian Gherghina & Dan Cosmin Petrache, 2017. "Approaches on Correlation between Board of Directors and Risk Management in Resilient Economies," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-15, January.
    18. Jan Hanousek & Anastasiya Shamshur & Jiri Tresl, 2017. "Firm Efficiency, Foreign Ownership and CEO Gender in Corrupt Environments," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp595, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.

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    Keywords

    fund managers; gender differences; risk; overconfidence; tournament behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty

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