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Financial Knowledge among Educated Women: Room for Improvement

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  • MAHNAZ MAHDAVI
  • NICHOLAS J. HORTON

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="joca12032-abs-0001"> We examined financial knowledge among educated women with at least a bachelor's degree by analyzing the results from a 2009 survey representing a well-defined sample ( N = 4,344) of alumnae from a highly selective liberal arts college for women. This study found modest levels of financial knowledge with wide variation. Specifically, in the sample of alumnae, respondents in an older cohort, with higher household income, and those who obtained an MBA degree exhibit higher levels of financial knowledge. These results highlighted the need for effective financial education for many college-educated women.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahnaz Mahdavi & Nicholas J. Horton, 2014. "Financial Knowledge among Educated Women: Room for Improvement," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 403-417, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jconsa:v:48:y:2014:i:2:p:403-417
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/joca.12032
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S. & Curto, Vilsa, 2012. "Financial sophistication in the older population," CFS Working Paper Series 2012/08, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    2. van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob, 2011. "Financial literacy and stock market participation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 449-472, August.
    3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 413-417, May.
    4. Annamaria Lusardi, 2008. "Financial Literacy: An Essential Tool for Informed Consumer Choice?," NFI Working Papers 2008-WP-13, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    5. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2011. "The Outlook for Financial Literacy," NBER Working Papers 17077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Angela Hung & Joanne Yoong & Elizabeth Brown, 2012. "Empowering Women Through Financial Awareness and Education," OECD Working Papers on Finance, Insurance and Private Pensions 14, OECD Publishing.
    7. Bucks, Brian & Pence, Karen, 2008. "Do borrowers know their mortgage terms?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 218-233, September.
    8. Marianne A. Hilgert & Jeanne M. Hogarth & Sondra G. Beverly, 2003. "Household financial management: the connection between knowledge and behavior," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jul, pages 309-322.
    9. Raquel Fonseca & Kathleen J. Mullen & Gema Zamarro & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2012. "What Explains the Gender Gap in Financial Literacy? The Role of Household Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 90-106, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
    2. Antonia Grohmann & Annekathrin Schoofs, 2018. "Financial Literacy and Intra-Household Decision Making: Evidence from Rwanda," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1720, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:2:p:255-283 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Annamaria Lusardi & Rob Alessie & Maarten van Rooij, 2017. "How Financially Literate Are Women? An Overview and New Insights," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 255-283, July.
    5. Alfonso Arellano & Noelia Camara & David Tuesta, 2014. "El efecto de la autoconfianza en el conocimiento financiero," Working Papers 1427, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    6. Alfonso Arellano & Noelia Camara & David Tuesta, 2015. "Explaining the Gender Gap in Financial Literacy: the Role of Non-Cognitive Skills," Working Papers 15/32, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    7. Antonia Grohmann & Olaf Hübler & Roy Kouwenberg & Lukas Menkhoff, 2016. "Financial Literacy: Thai Middle Class Women Do Not Lag behind," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1615, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    8. Alfonso Arellano & Noelia Camara & David Tuesta, 2014. "The effect of self-confidence on financial literacy," Working Papers 1428, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.

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