IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedgrb/y2003ijulp309-322nv.89no.7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Household financial management: the connection between knowledge and behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Marianne A. Hilgert
  • Jeanne M. Hogarth
  • Sondra G. Beverly

Abstract

Consumer financial literacy has become a growing concern to educators, community groups, businesses, government agencies, and policymakers. Correspondingly, there has been an increase in the number and types of financial education programs available to households. Many of these programs focus on providing information to consumers and operate under the implicit assumption that increases in information and knowledge will lead to changes in financial-management practices and behaviors. ; This article focuses on four financial-management activities--cash-flow management, credit management, saving, and investment. Data from the Surveys of Consumers are used to analyze some of the connections between knowledge and behavior--what consumers know and what they do. Overall, financial knowledge was statistically linked to financial practices: Those who knew more were more likely to engage in recommended financial practices. In addition, certain types of financial knowledge were statistically significant for particular financial practices--knowing about credit, saving, and investment was correlated with higher probabilities of engaging in recommended credit, saving, and investment practices respectively. Although the causality could flow in either direction, this finding indicates that increases in knowledge may lead to improvements in financial-management practices. Thus, financial education in combination with skill-building and audience-targeted motivational strategies may be one way to elicit the desired behavioral changes in financial-management practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Marianne A. Hilgert & Jeanne M. Hogarth & Sondra G. Beverly, 2003. "Household financial management: the connection between knowledge and behavior," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jul, pages 309-322.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgrb:y:2003:i:jul:p:309-322:n:v.89no.7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2003/0703lead.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial literacy ; Education;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgrb:y:2003:i:jul:p:309-322:n:v.89no.7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (FRB Librarian). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.