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Defining and Measuring Financial Literacy

Author

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  • Angela Hung
  • Andrew M. Parker
  • Joanne K. Yoong

Abstract

Current economic conditions have raised serious concerns about Americans' financial security, especially for those who lack the skills and resources to withstand financial market downswings and take advantage of upswings. However, significant debate continues about the role of financial literacy, the extent of the problem it truly represents, and the best way to address it. A large part of this debate may be linked to the fact that a great deal of variation continues to exist in how researchers define and measure financial literacy itself. By providing a review of theoretical and operational approaches to financial literacy, as well as a conceptual model and composite definition of financial literacy, this paper contributes towards further sharpening this debate.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela Hung & Andrew M. Parker & Joanne K. Yoong, 2009. "Defining and Measuring Financial Literacy," Working Papers WR-708, RAND Corporation.
  • Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:wr-708
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Patrick J. Bayer & B. Douglas Bernheim & John Karl Scholz, 2009. "The Effects Of Financial Education In The Workplace: Evidence From A Survey Of Employers," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(4), pages 605-624, October.
    8. Christelis, Dimitris & Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario, 2010. "Cognitive abilities and portfolio choice," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 18-38, January.
    9. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia Mitchell, 2007. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning: New Evidence from the Rand American Life Panel," Working Papers wp157, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
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    15. repec:use:tkiwps:2323 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
    2. Stacey A. Wood & Pi-Ju Liu & Yaniv Hanoch & Sara Estevez-Cores, 2016. "Editor's choice Importance of Numeracy as a Risk Factor for Elder Financial Exploitation in a Community Sample," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 71(6), pages 978-986.
    3. Fisch, Jill E. & Wilkinson-Ryan, Tess & Firth, Kristin, 2016. "Investor financial literacy in the workplace," CFS Working Paper Series 554, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    4. William Barnett & Mingzhi Hu & Xue Wang, 2018. "Does the Utilization of Information Communication Technology Promote Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Rural China," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 201802, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2018.
    5. Alberto Montagnoli & Mirko Moro & Robert Wright, 2016. "Financial literacy and attitudes to redistribution," Working Papers 1605, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    6. Levy, Matthew R. & Tasoff, Joshua, 2017. "Exponential-growth bias and overconfidence," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 1-14.
    7. Entorf, Horst & Hou, Jia, 2018. "Financial education for the disadvantaged? A review," SAFE Working Paper Series 205, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    8. repec:eee:joreco:v:25:y:2015:i:c:p:122-129 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Entorf, Horst & Hou, Jia, 2018. "Financial Education for the Disadvantaged? A Review," IZA Discussion Papers 11515, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Gopi Shah Goda & Matthew R. Levy & Colleen Flaherty Manchester & Aaron Sojourner & Joshua Tasoff, 2015. "The Role of Time Preferences and Exponential-Growth Bias in Retirement Savings," NBER Working Papers 21482, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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