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What happens when Wal-Mart comes to your country? multinational firms' entry, productivity, and inefficiency

  • Silvio Contessi

Despite the microeconomic evidence supporting the superior idiosyncratic productivity of multinational firms (MFN) and their affiliates, cross-country studies fail to find robust evidence of a positive relationship between Foreign Direct Investment and growth. In order to study the aggregate implications of MNF entry and production, I develop a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium model with firm heterogeneity where MNF sort according to their own productivity. Entry and production of MNF contribute to aggregate productivity growth at decreasing rates over time but potentially crowd out domestic producers due to increased product and factor market competition. I compare the aggregate benefit of productivity contributions with the cost of crowding out and argue that composition and crowding-out effects can help explain the conflicting evidence on the impact of Foreign Direct Investment on growth.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2010-043.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2010-043
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  1. Carol Corrado & Paul Lengermann & Larry Slifman, 2007. "The contribution of multinational corporations to U.S. productivity growth, 1977-2000," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-21, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  13. Matthias Arnold, Jens & Javorcik, Beata S., 2009. "Gifted kids or pushy parents? Foreign direct investment and plant productivity in Indonesia," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 42-53, September.
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  15. Alfaro, Laura & Chanda, Areendam & Kalemli-Ozcan, Sebnem & Sayek, Selin, 2010. "Does foreign direct investment promote growth? Exploring the role of financial markets on linkages," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 242-256, March.
  16. Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L. & Rivera-Batiz, Luis A., 1990. "The effects of direct foreign investment in the presence of increasing returns due to specialization," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 287-307, November.
  17. Chiara Criscuolo, 2005. "Foreign Affiliates in OECD Economies: Presence, Performance and Contribution to Host Countries' Growth," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2005(2), pages 109-139.
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