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From Beijing to Bentonville: Do Multinational Retailers Link Markets?

Author

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  • Keith Head
  • Ran Jing
  • Deborah L. Swenson

Abstract

Each of the world's largest retailers---Walmart, Carrefour, Tesco, and Metro---entered China after 1995. Their subsequent expansion in China may have influenced Chinese exports through two channels. First, they may have enhanced bilateral exports between the retailers' Chinese operations and destination countries also served by stores in the retailers' networks. Second, Chinese city-level exports to all destinations may have grown if multinational retailer presence enhanced the general export capabilities of local suppliers. Evidence from Chinese city-level retail goods exports supports the capability hypothesis as the expansion of Chinese city exports follows the geographic expansion of the retailers' Chinese stores and global procurement centers.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith Head & Ran Jing & Deborah L. Swenson, 2010. "From Beijing to Bentonville: Do Multinational Retailers Link Markets?," NBER Working Papers 16288, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16288
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cheptea, Angela & Emlinger, Charlotte & Latouche, Karine, 2014. "Do exporting firms benefit from retail internationalization? Evidence from France," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182706, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    3. Angela Cheptea, 2014. "Do multinational retailers affect the export competitveness of host countries?," IAW Discussion Papers 106, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
    4. Blanchard, Emily & Chesnokova, Tatyana & Willmann, Gerald, 2013. "Private labels and international trade: Trading variety for volume," Kiel Working Papers 1829, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. repec:eee:inecon:v:112:y:2018:i:c:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bai, Xue & Krishna, Kala & Ma, Hong, 2017. "How you export matters: Export mode, learning and productivity in China," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 122-137.
    7. Chen, Bo, 2017. "Upstreamness, exports, and wage inequality: Evidence from Chinese manufacturing data," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 66-74.
    8. Asian Development Bank Institute, 2017. "Asian Economic Integration Report 2016," Working Papers id:11730, eSocialSciences.
    9. Raff, Horst & Schmitt, Nicolas, 2015. "Retailing and international trade: A survey of the literature," Economics Working Papers 2015-02, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    10. Andriani, Pierpaolo & Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten, 2011. "Performing comparative advantage: The case of the global coffee business," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 167, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    11. repec:spr:weltar:v:153:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10290-017-0284-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:bla:pacecr:v:22:y:2017:i:1:p:123-143 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Pierpaolo Andriani & Carsten Herrmann-Pillath, 2015. "Transactional innovation as performative action: transforming comparative advantage in the global coffee business," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 371-400, April.
    14. Angela Cheptea & Charlotte Emlinger & Karine Latouche, 2015. "Exporting firms and retail internationalization. Evidence from France," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 15-13, INRA UMR SMART-LERECO.
    15. Kondor, Péter & Koren, Miklós & Pál, Jenő & Szeidl, Ádám, 2014. "Cégek kapcsolati hálózatainak gazdasági szerepe
      [The economic role of the networks of connections possessed by firms]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 1341-1360.
    16. Lin, Faqin & Hu, Cui & Fuchs, Andreas, 2016. "How Do Firms Respond to Political Tensions? The Heterogeneity of the Dalai Lama Effect on Trade," Working Papers 0628, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    17. Contessi, Silvio, 2010. "Multinational Firms' Entry and Productivity: Some Aggregate Implications of Firm-level Heterogeneity," Working Papers 2010-043, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 26 Aug 2015.
    18. Cheptea, Angela & Emlinger, Charlotte & Latouche, Karine, 2013. "Multinational Retailers and Firm-Level Exports," Proceedings Issues, 2013: Employment, Immigration and Trade, December 15-17, 2013, Clearwater Beach, Florida 182499, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    19. Loretta Fung & Jin Tan Liu & Deborah L. Swenson, 2014. "Multinational Location Decisions and the Access to Imported Inputs," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 218-237, June.
    20. Deborah L. Swenson & Huiya Chen, 2014. "Multinational Exposure and the Quality of New Chinese Exports," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(1), pages 41-66, February.
    21. Cheptea, Angela, 2016. "Multinational retailers and host countries’ export competitiveness," 149th Seminar, October 27-28, 2016, Rennes, France 244952, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    22. Charlotte Emlinger & Sandra Poncet, 2016. "With a Little Help from My Friends: Multinational Retailers and China's consumer Market Penetration," Working Papers 2016-01, CEPII research center.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F39 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Other
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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