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From Beijing to Bentonville: Do Multinational Retailers Link Markets?

  • Keith Head
  • Ran Jing
  • Deborah L. Swenson

Each of the world's largest retailers---Walmart, Carrefour, Tesco, and Metro---entered China after 1995. Their subsequent expansion in China may have influenced Chinese exports through two channels. First, they may have enhanced bilateral exports between the retailers' Chinese operations and destination countries also served by stores in the retailers' networks. Second, Chinese city-level exports to all destinations may have grown if multinational retailer presence enhanced the general export capabilities of local suppliers. Evidence from Chinese city-level retail goods exports supports the capability hypothesis as the expansion of Chinese city exports follows the geographic expansion of the retailers' Chinese stores and global procurement centers.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16288.

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Date of creation: Aug 2010
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Publication status: published as Head, Keith & Jing, Ran & Swenson, Deborah L., 2014. "From Beijing to Bentonville: Do multinational retailers link markets?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 79-92.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16288
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