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Understanding the New Normal : The Role of Demographics

Author

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  • Etienne Gagnon
  • Benjamin K. Johannsen
  • J. David Lopez-Salido

Abstract

Since the onset of the Great Recession, the U.S. economy has experienced low real GDP growth and low real interest rates, including for long maturities. We show that these developments were largely predictable by calibrating an overlapping-generation model with a rich demographic structure to observed and projected changes in U.S. population, family composition, life expectancy, and labor market activity. The model accounts for a 1¼–percentage point decline in both real GDP growth and the equilibrium real interest rate since 1980—essentially all of the permanent declines in those variables according to some recent estimates. The model also implies that these declines were especially pronounced over the past decade or so because of demographic factors most-directly associated with the baby boom and the passing of the information technology boom. Our results further suggest that real GDP growth and real interest rates will remain low in coming decades, consistent with the U.S economy having reached a “new normal.”

Suggested Citation

  • Etienne Gagnon & Benjamin K. Johannsen & J. David Lopez-Salido, 2016. "Understanding the New Normal : The Role of Demographics," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-080, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2016-80 DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2016.080
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The New Normal
      by thebusinesscycleblog in The business cycle blog on 2016-10-15 20:07:31

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demographics ; Equilibrium real interest rate ; GDP growth ; New normal;

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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