IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eid/wpaper/32992.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Work Now, Pay Later? An Empirical Analysis of the Pension Pay-Trade Off

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Haynes
  • John Sessions

    (University of Bath)

Abstract

We investigate the potential compensating differential between wages and pensions on a sample of British workers. Random effects panel regressions are run applying the Schiller and Weiss (1980) methodology to test whether a pension-wage compensating differential exists. Using data from British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) and derived prospective pension variables, calculated by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), the regression results do not support evidence for a trade off. Further analysis finds no significant differences in results between public and private sector workers, even after controlling for sample selection bias wage.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Haynes & John Sessions, 2011. "Work Now, Pay Later? An Empirical Analysis of the Pension Pay-Trade Off," Department of Economics Working Papers 05/11, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:eid:wpaper:32992
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://purehost.bath.ac.uk/ws/files/9439544/work_now_pay_later.pdf
    File Function: Final published version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sarah Brown & Lisa Farrell & Mark N. Harris & John G. Sessions, 2006. "Risk preference and employment contract type," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 849-863, October.
    2. James J. Heckman, 1976. "The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 475-492, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Andrew Clark & Fabien Postel-Vinay, 2009. "Job security and job protection," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 207-239, April.
    4. Robert S. Smith & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1983. "Estimating Wage-Fringe Trade-Offs: Some Data Problems," NBER Chapters, in: The Measurement of Labor Cost, pages 347-370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Montgomery, Edward & Shaw, Kathryn & Benedict, Mary Ellen, 1992. "Pensions and Wages: An Hedonic Price Theory Approach," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(1), pages 111-128, February.
    6. Patacchini, Eleonora & Andrietti, Vincenzo, 2004. "Occupationa pensions, wages and tenure wage profiles," UC3M Working papers. Economics we043612, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    7. Hersch, Joni & Pickton, Todd S, 1995. "Risk-Taking Activities and Heterogeneity of Job-Risk Tradeoffs," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 205-217, December.
    8. Gustman, Alan L. & Steinmeier, Thomas L., 1993. "Pension portability and labor mobility : Evidence from the survey of income and program participation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 299-323, March.
    9. Currie, Janet & Madrian, Brigitte C., 1999. "Health, health insurance and the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.),Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 50, pages 3309-3416, Elsevier.
    10. Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1986. "Earnings and Pension Compensation: The Effect of Eligibility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 101(2), pages 341-361.
    11. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2009. "The value of teachers' pensions," IFS Working Papers W09/07, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    12. Jonathan Gruber & Alan B. Krueger, 1991. "The Incidence of Mandated Employer-Provided Insurance: Lessons from Workers' Compensation Insurance," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 5, pages 111-144, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde & Jürgen Schupp & Gert G. Wagner, 2011. "Individual Risk Attitudes: Measurement, Determinants, And Behavioral Consequences," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 522-550, June.
    14. George A. Akerlof & Lawrence F. Katz, 1989. "Workers' Trust Funds and the Logic of Wage Profiles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(3), pages 525-536.
    15. Jeremy I. Bulow & Wayne Landsman, 1985. "The Relationship between Wages and Benefits," NBER Chapters, in: Pensions, Labor, and Individual Choice, pages 379-398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Joni Hersch & W. Kip Viscusi, 1990. "Cigarette Smoking, Seatbelt Use, and Differences in Wage-Risk Tradeoffs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(2), pages 202-227.
    17. Joao F. Cocco & Paula Lopes, 2004. "(UBS Pensions series 26) Defined Benefit or Defined Contribution? An Empirical Study of Pension Choices," FMG Discussion Papers dp505, Financial Markets Group.
    18. Pozzebon, Silvana & Mitchell, Olivia S, 1989. "Married Women's Retirement Behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 2(1), pages 39-53.
    19. Inkmann, Joachim, 2006. "Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24516, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    20. Richard A. Ippolito, 1994. "Pensions and Indenture Premia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(3), pages 795-812.
    21. Buurman, Margaretha & Delfgaauw, Josse & Dur, Robert & Van den Bossche, Seth, 2012. "Public sector employees: Risk averse and altruistic?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 279-291.
    22. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Carl Emmerson, 2005. "The Balance Between Defined Benefit, Defined Contribution, and State Provision," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 466-476, 04/05.
    23. Bonin, Holger & Dohmen, Thomas & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Sunde, Uwe, 2007. "Cross-sectional earnings risk and occupational sorting: The role of risk attitudes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 926-937, December.
    24. Johnson, Richard W, 1996. "The Impact of Human Capital Investments on Pension Benefits," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 520-554, July.
    25. W. Kip Viscusi & Joni Hersch, 2001. "Cigarette Smokers As Job Risk Takers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 269-280, May.
    26. Morley Gunderson & Douglas Hyatt & James E. Pesando, 1992. "Wage-Pension Trade-offs in Collective Agreements," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 146-160, October.
    27. Schiller, Bradley R & Weiss, Randall D, 1980. "Pensions and Wages: A Test for Equalizing Differences," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(4), pages 529-538, November.
    28. Cocco, Joao F. & Lopes, Paula, 2004. "Defined benefit or defined contribution?: an empirical study of pension choices," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24751, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    29. Curme, Michael & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1990. "The Impact of the Threat of Bankruptcy on the Structure of Compensation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 419-447, October.
    30. Smith, Robert Stewart, 1981. "Compensating Differentials for Pensions and Underfunding in the Public Sector," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(3), pages 463-468, August.
    31. Joseph G. Altonji & Emiko Usui, 2007. "Work Hours, Wages, and Vacation Leave," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(3), pages 408-428, April.
    32. Even, William E & Macpherson, David A, 1990. "The Gender Gap in Pensions and Wages," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 259-265, May.
    33. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1980. "Retirement System Characteristics and Compensating Wage Differentials in the Public Sector," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(4), pages 470-483, July.
    34. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 1996. "What Are Occupational Pension Plan Entitlements Worth in Britain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 213-238, May.
    35. Margaretha Buurman & Josse Delfgaauw & Robert Dur & Seth Van den Bossche, 2012. "Public Sector Employees: Risk Averse and Altruistic?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3851, CESifo.
    36. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1987. "Pensions, Efficiency Wages, and Job Mobility," NBER Working Papers 2426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    37. Don Bellante & Albert N. Link, 1981. "Are Public Sector Workers More Risk Averse Than Private Sector Workers?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 34(3), pages 408-412, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Platanakis, Emmanouil & Sutcliffe, Charles, 2016. "Pension scheme redesign and wealth redistribution between the members and sponsor: The USS rule change in October 2011," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 14-28.
    2. Maurizio Caserta & Livio Ferrante & Francesco Reito, 2020. "Who pays for workplace benefits?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 88(4), pages 556-574, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    monitoring; tenure; efficiency wages;

    JEL classification:

    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eid:wpaper:32992. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Scholarly Communications Librarian). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/debatuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.