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Pensions and Wages: A Test for Equalizing Differences


  • Schiller, Bradley R
  • Weiss, Randall D


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  • Schiller, Bradley R & Weiss, Randall D, 1980. "Pensions and Wages: A Test for Equalizing Differences," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(4), pages 529-538, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:62:y:1980:i:4:p:529-38

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Binswanger, Hans P., 1973. "A Cost Function Approach To The Measurement Of Factor Demand Elasticities And Elasticities Of Substitution," Staff Papers 13478, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    2. Rosen, Sherwin & Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1974. "A Disequilibrium Model of Demand for Factors of Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 264-270, May.
    3. Ernst R. Berndt & Bronwyn H. Hall & Robert E. Hall & Jerry A. Hausman, 1974. "Estimation and Inference in Nonlinear Structural Models," NBER Chapters,in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 3, number 4, pages 653-665 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Marc Nerlove, 1967. "Distributed Lags and Unobserved Components in Economic Time Series," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 221, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    5. Y. Mundlak, 1968. "Elasticities of Substitution and the Theory of Derived Demand," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 225-236.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bünstorf, Guido & Krabel, Stefan, 2014. "Gender and Immigration: Double Negative Effects in the Labor Market Outcomes of University Graduates in Germany?," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100290, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Antonis Adam & Thomas Moutos, 2009. "Pension Funding In A Unionized Economy," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 56(2), pages 213-231, May.
    3. John Baffoe-Bonnie, 2003. "Incidence and Duration of Unemployment Spells: Implications on the Wage Differentials of Part-Time and Full-Time Workers," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 227-242, April.
    4. Leslie E. Papke, 1995. "Participation in and Contributions to 401(k) Pension Plans: Evidence from Plan Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 311-325.
    5. Maria Donovan Fitzpatrick, 2015. "How Much Are Public School Teachers Willing to Pay for Their Retirement Benefits?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 165-188, November.
    6. Montgomery, Edward & Shaw, Kathryn, 1997. "Pensions and Wage Premia," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(3), pages 510-522, July.
    7. Joseph Antos, 1983. "Analysis of Labor Cost: Data Concepts and Sources," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement of Labor Cost, pages 153-182 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. John Baffoe-Bonnie, 2009. "Black–White Wage Differentials in a Multiple Sample Selection Bias Model," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(1), pages 1-16, March.
    9. Gerard Hughes & Brian Nolan, 1999. "Competitive and Segmented Labour Markets and Exclusion from Retirement Income," Papers WP108, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    10. Olivia S. Mitchell & Gary S. Fields, 1981. "The Effects of Pensions and Earnings on Retirement: A Review Essay," NBER Working Papers 0772, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Haynes, Jonathan B. & Sessions, John G., 2013. "Work now, pay later? An empirical analysis of the pension–pay trade off," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 835-843.
    12. Inkmann, Joachim, 2006. "Compensating wage differentials for defined benefit and defined contribution occupational pension scheme benefits," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24516, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Montgomery, Edward & Shaw, Kathryn & Benedict, Mary Ellen, 1992. "Pensions and Wages: An Hedonic Price Theory Approach," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(1), pages 111-128, February.
    14. John Baffoe-Bonnie, 2004. "Interindustry part-time and full-time wage differentials: regional and national analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 107-118.
    15. Erwin Ooghe & Erik Schokkaert & Jef Flechet, 2003. "The Incidence of Social Security Contributions: An Empirical Analysis," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 81-106, June.
    16. Ndamsa Dickson Thomas & Baye Mendjo Francis & Epo Boniface Ngah, 2013. "Responsiveness of Private Sector Household Income to Employment Vulnerability in Cameroon," EuroEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 1(32), pages 153-177, May.
    17. Robert L. Clark & Joseph F. Quinn, 1999. "Effects of Pensions on Labor Markets and Retirement," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 431, Boston College Department of Economics.

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